Fall pie recipes from Sift: we're in love

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It’s that time of year. Time to dust off the rolling pin, come home from the orchard or farmstand, and choose which fall pie recipes will grace your table.

Sift has done some exploring for you, and would like you to make the acquaintance of the talented Emily Hilliard. She contributed the feature story on the cover: the Anthropology of Pie. We think it’s a fascinating story, and hope you’ll pick up your own copy of Sift to read it. But if you want to cut to the chase and get baking, Emily has shared some of the show-stopping recipes from her blog, Nothing in the House, with us – and now, with you!

Her recipes are unique, creative, and very, very tasty.

fall pie recipes via@kingarthurflourTake this riff on a fall favorite, Delicata Squash Pie. Those beautiful gold- and green-striped squash bake up smooth and sweet, and are dressy enough to deserve a swirl of heavy cream for a bit of bling on top.

Fall Pie recipes via@kingarthurflourOr salute this harvest time with two flavors that liven up a classic pie category. Chess pies are custard-based, with a hint of cornmeal in the filling for crunch. Emily livens up the whole shebang by baking a Cranberry Chocolate Chess version. Sweet, tart, rich, and toothsome, it’ll be sure to wake up the Thanksgiving dessert table.

Fall Pie recipes via@kingarthurflourThe everyday becomes exotic in the hands of Emily’s friend Alison Kave, author of First Prize Pies. This Bourbon Ginger Pecan Pie is her invention. Three kinds of ginger for spice, brown sugar and maple syrup for sweet, and bourbon for smoooooooth.

Fall Pie recipes via@kingarthurflourLast, but most definitely not least, is this tour de force: Passionfruit Meringue Pie with Macadamia Crust. Luscious passionfruit curd sits on a crunchy macadamia and gingersnap crust, crowned with a toasted meringue that commands attention. And tasting.

As do so many of the recipes and baking discoveries in Sift.

fall pie recipes via@kingarthurflourLet’s not forget the Gingered Plum Streusel beauty on the cover!

Join us in celebrating all great flavors this fall, as we live, breathe, and most enthusiastically, bake.

Susan Reid
About

Chef Susan Reid grew up in New Jersey, graduated from Bates College and the Culinary Institute of America, and is presently the Food Editor of Sift magazine. She does demos, appearances, and answers food (and baking) questions from all quarters.

comments

  1. Kalisa

    Mmm, streusel topping. The savior of everyone who can’t make a lattice topping to save their lives. These all look great! I’m personally more of a cobbler person (see: streusel) but I admire everyone who puts for the effort to perfect their pie crust.

    Reply
  2. June

    Just bought Sift last night at my local food coop. All the way home in the car – an 1 1/2 hr. trip – I salivated over the photos and the recipes. Today I think the Rieska will be the first of many recipes I try. Thanks for a beautiful and thought-provoking publication. I can always count on King Arthur.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Cindy, thanks for sharing your feedback with us regarding our new magazine. We tried to take the best parts of the Baking Sheet and revitalize them in new, inventive, (and beautiful!) ways Sift. We’d love to know more about what you think Sift is missing so we can work to improve this in the future. Please give us a call at 800-827-6836 to share your thoughts with us. Kye@KAF

  3. rsp

    saw a reference in comments to your vegan banana bread; searched for it on your site; couldn’t find it. Would you send a link?

    Thanks

    Reply
  4. Livingwell

    I notice you say to grease the glass pie plate before adding filling. Greasing a cake pan helps with any sticking issues, but I have never heard of greasing a pie plate and have never done so. Does it enhance browning of the bottom crust?

    Reply
    1. Kelli

      as a professional pie baker, I have never greased a pie plate and I have never had a slice stick. I do , however use an all butter crust, it makes it’s own grease.

  5. Jen

    Hi Susan. I read your tutorial about a month ago on getting piecrust troubles ironed out. I actually see a dramatic difference when I spray a little Pam spray on my pans before I lay the crust in as far as getting every piece to come out beautifully. And furthermore, I finally took your advice (I think I remember seeing this demonstrated and ignoring it for ages!) on adding the fat in two parts; cutting it more coarsely when doing the second addition. I use half and half lard and Crisco, as my mother in law showed me. I just can’t get away from what a fantastic crust it makes. When I cut the much richer lard in first till it was pretty crumbly and then added the Crisco second, leaving larger bits, I got a pastry crust that I have never had the equal to, not even when using all butter, as far as beautiful flavor and flaky flaky flaky texture. It was phenomenal!! You advice and articles are wonderful, and I always strive to learn and get better. Thanks for helping me do that with my pie crusts. Jen Jorgensen Madison, WI

    Reply

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