Pull-Apart Breads: shareable, delicious breads

Imagine a bread so soft and buttery that it pulls apart into tender pieces at the slightest touch. Is your dream bread crunchy with a caramelized cinnamon-sugar crust? Or rich with a garlicky butter and flecked with rosemary? Happily, any of the above, and many more, are easily achievable at home.

Depending on the shape, we call this bread pull-apart bread, or bubble loaf, or monkey bread. The Brits call it “tear and share,” and I think they’re onto something with that name.

Consider this a “choose your own adventure” bread. Start with one master batch of dough, and pick your ideal shape. At the final step of the recipe, the dough can easily turn sweet or savory: spread it with a garlic- and herb-infused butter, or roll it in spiced sugar.

Let’s get down to the bread-y business.

For the basic dough, I like to use the base of our Butterflake Herb Loaf. It’s easy to work with and yields consistent and reliable results.

For the dough, you’ll need:

1 cup milk
1/4 cup butter
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons instant yeast or active dry yeast
4 1/2 to 4 3/4 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
2 tablespoons potato flour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Start by warming your milk and pouring it over your butter to melt it. Add the sugar and salt and let it cool slightly, then add your eggs, yeast, potato flour, and all-purpose flour.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Once you’ve mixed and kneaded your dough, let it rise in a warm place until it doubles in size. A good way to quickly check to see if your dough is ready is to press it with your finger. If the indentation remains without springing back, it’s ready to go.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Now you need to decide how you want to shape your dough. Today I’ll show you three easy techniques and a few tips for playing around with them.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

The most basic shape is a pull-apart loaf. Many recipes instruct you to slice your dough into squares and stack them sideways into a loaf pan: Do not do this! The loaf rarely comes out looking neat and uniform, plus it’s a difficult and messy method.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Instead, roll your dough 1/2” thick. Using an English muffin ring, large biscuit cutter, or wide-mouth Mason jar lid, cut circles out of the dough.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Spread half of each circle generously with your filling. I’ve decided to use a softened butter mixed with rosemary, garlic powder, and salt. You could use any herbed butter, or butter with grated cheese for a gooey, cheesy loaf, or even butter with dried fruit and sweet spices.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Fold the circles in half and place them, round side up, in a greased loaf pan.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Press each folded circle into the pan until it’s full. Then cover it loosely with plastic wrap and let it rise for about 30 minutes, or until puffy.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

When you’re ready to bake, preheat the oven to 350°F and bake the loaf for 22 to 24 minutes. It should be golden brown all over. You can see here how beautifully golden brown the bottom is, which is what you want!

Now let’s say you don’t want an entire loaf. When I want individual pull-apart breads for a party, I like to bake the breads in a muffin tin.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Roll your risen dough to a large 1/2”-thick rectangle. Using a knife or pizza cutter, divide the rectangle into two long halves. Spread the filling on top of each half.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Next, place one half on top of the other and slice down the dough, dividing it into four or five squares. Stack the squares on top of one another, so that you have three or four squares of dough in each stack. Place the stacks sideways in the tins of well-greased muffin pan.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Let the dough rise for another 30 minutes, then bake in a preheated 350°F oven for about 20 minutes, or until golden brown.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

That’s all well and good, but what about dessert? Our last variation is the classic monkey bread. Take your risen bread dough, and instead of rolling it out as we did in the last two variations, place it on a lightly floured surface.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

Grease a 9” round pan. Pull pieces of the dough off (aim for about 2” chunks) and roll them into balls. Dunk each ball in water and then roll it in cinnamon-sugar. Place the sugared balls into your pan, pressing them against each other in concentric circles until the pan is full.

Pull-Apart Breads via @kingarthurflour

You can easily make monkey bread in a tube pan or in miniature round pans. Just adjust the size of the dough balls to fit your pan. You can also dunk the balls in melted butter instead of water if you want to get decadent. I prefer the water method, as it gives the bread a fantastically syrupy crust and doesn’t taste too rich.

Instead of cinnamon-sugar, try other sweet combinations. Use a caramel or peanut butter glaze, or roll the balls in a cardamom or lemon zest sugar.

Bake the rolls in a preheated 350°F oven for about 25 to 30 minutes, or until puffy and golden brown. The baking time will change if you use a different size or shape of pan, so just keep an eye on your bread as it bakes.

There you have it: a world of delicate, buttery pull-apart breads at your fingertips. Go forth and experiment, and don’t hold back! We love to be inspired by our fellow bakers, so tell us your favorite flavor combinations in the comments.

comments

  1. Amy S

    This is as if a prayer has been answered. I’m looking for a good bread to include with a dinner of beef stew I’ll be serving on an upcoming evening after work. Ideally, I want the bread to be warm from the oven for dinner, but I don’t have a lot of time between getting things ready and serving (I’m making the stew a day in advance and reheating). Could I assemble the bread in the loaf pan ahead of time (e.g., the evening before), chill it until needed, bring it to room temp, rise, and then bake the loaf? Or if that might not work, does it reheat well wrapped in foil and slowly heated for a few minutes before service? Any ideas would be welcome.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes, you might bake the bread and refresh or warm for dinner. To refresh bread, set the oven to 275′ and let the bread warm 5 – 10 minutes. The other option is to pan the bread and refrigerate before it rises. It will rise slowly in the refrigerator so you can bake fresh closer to party time. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

  2. JuliaJ

    Can mashed potato flakes be substituted for the potato flour? If so, should I just weigh out the same amount of mashed potato flakes? Thank you.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Julia, we usually recommend using twice the amount (by volume) of potato flakes when substituting for potato flour, however you can add equal the amount of potato flakes by weight. Barb@KAF

  3. Deb smith

    Can I substitute potato flour with mashed potatoes or even regular flour ? I don’t have that or instant potatoes .

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Deb, you can add a few tablespoons of mashed potatoes to the recipe or use potato water (the water you cook the potatoes in) instead of the milk and then add 1/4 cup dried milk powder with the flour. Barb@KAF

  4. Kurt

    I actually just finished baking the Monkey pull apart cinnamon bread. It’s a good recipe but I think I’d would probably prefer this one as it uses butter and milk, which I think would give more flavor to the bread than the other recipe. So, I’ll have to keep this one and give it a try too 🙂

    Reply
  5. Hl

    I made this tonight and baked per instructions and it was still raw in the middle. I did not use a glass loaf pan but recommend a longer baking time. Perhaps I did too much herbed butter ? I used 8 tbl and baked an additional 15 minutes.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      That is possible, though other factors including your baking pan (was it large enough or dark in color?) and your oven come into play as well. We strongly suggest testing your breads with a thermometer to make sure that they are done. This type of bread will be done around 200 degrees. Jon@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Toby, no potato starch consists of only the extracted starch from the potato, while potato flour is made from peeled dried potatoes, so contains more of the whole potato. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You can adjust this recipe to include some whole grains if you like! Start by replacing half of the all purpose flour with whole wheat or white whole wheat for a less assertive whole wheat flavor. You will need to add additional liquid, about 2 teaspoons per cup of whole wheat flour you use, and for best results allow the dough to rest for 15-20 minutes before kneading the dough for the first time. Our blog called, Yeast bread, rolls, and pizza gives detailed instructions on how to successfully add whole wheat flour to your favorite recipes. Check it out! Kye@KAF

  6. Nina Mangan

    What would you adjust for a gluten free version beside using gluten free King Arthur flour? some xanthem gum? Increase the potatoe flour?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Nina, this recipe does not lend itself well to gluten-free conversion because of the amount of rolling that needs to be accomplished. Most gluten-free bread recipes are more of a batter consistency, so would be hard to roll out in the way described. Barb@KAF

  7. Crissy

    What a wonderful recipe! I can’t wait to try it. Couple of questions. Can I freeze the bread after baking? If so, how long with it last? Thank you.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Crissy, you can almost always store baked bread in the freezer. It should be good for up to three months in the freezer. We recommend freezing the bread after it has cooled completely. Wrap it in double layers of plastic wrap or 2 plastic bags or to protect the bread from freezer burn. Barb@KAF

  8. Jan Baxter

    Would you give me the quantities of the butter, rosemary, garlic powder and salt. These sound wonderful and perfect for Thanksgiving. Thank you. Jan

    asked Posie for this info JB

    Reply
    1. Mary Louise Smith

      The amounts of rosemary, garlic powder is not listed in the original recipe. A bunch of other spices are listed.

      asked Posie for this info JB

    2. Posie Harwood , post author

      I used 1/2 cup of softened butter with about 2 teaspoons of rosemary and 1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder (to taste!). Enjoy!

    3. Posie Harwood , post author

      I used 1/2 cup of softened butter with about 2 teaspoons of rosemary and 1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder (to taste!). Really easy to adapt to whatever flavors you like — just taste the filling before you use it to make sure you like the balance of flavor!

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You certainly can, Kris. I would recommend adding an extra tablespoon of liquid per each cup of bread flour substituted because it will absorb more liquid than all-purpose flour. Barb@KAF

  9. Bernadette

    Could this be made ahead and frozen before it’s baked, as part of a gigantic make-ahead-and-freeze pre-holiday day? At what point would you freeze this so you could take it out and bake it fresh?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Bernadette, we don’t usually recommend freezing the unbaked bread dough. For best results I would freeze the baked bread, and warm wrapped in foil in the oven. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You’re correct, Shirley! If you find the dough is very warm coming off the Zo you may find it helpful to cool the dough off in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or so before you roll it out, as warm dough is stickier and a bit more difficult to roll out than cooler dough. Barb@KAF

  10. M.

    This looks like an excellent recipe. I don’t use potato flakes and have no potato flour. Is it possible to substitute mashed potatoes (from fresh potatoes) and, if so, how much? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      M., I would try adding 2 tablespoons mashed potatoes to the recipe in place of the potato flour. Barb@KAF

  11. Karen

    I really want to try these pull apart techniques! It looks like you’re using a light dough. Can I make this gluten free? Which of your gluten free recipes would you recommend for this? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Karen, this particular recipe would be difficult to make gluten-free because most gluten-free breads are more like a batter than a dough that can be rolled out. Here is our Gluten-Free Filled Breads recipe that might get you started in the right direction. Barb@KAF

  12. Wendy

    I like the idea of muffins. Do you think it would work to take them to the point of being ready to bake and then freeze? We only need two at a time, so it would be nice to be able to pull out of the freezer, thaw, bake and eat…

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Can’t say we have frozen batters before, Wendy. We would normally bake and freeze a muffin, but let us know how it turns out! Jon@KAF

  13. Kathryn Kemp

    Reading this, I had a flashback to my 5-year-old self, watching my Grandma Smith, who was a fabulous cook. Go halfway down the instructions and bake the folded-over pieces of dough flat on a cookie sheet. My Grandmother did this with a pat of butter in each one. I know this has some other name, but she called them “Pocket-book Rolls.” Kitchens are full of memories.

    Reply
  14. Jean Diemer

    Do you have a friendly print button so I can print the recipe without all of the pictures? Sorry I may have missed it on this page but didn’t see it. Can’t wait to try it. Thanks so much!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Although we don’t have a friendly button to print the blog posts without pictures, you can print the recipe by going to the recipe page and clicking on the words “printable version.” Here’s the link to the recipe. Barb@KAF

  15. Alex

    I don’t have any potato flour, and will likely be unable to get my hands on some any time soon. Is there something I could substitute for it that is more common?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Alex, you can either leave out the potato flour or add a few tablespoons of mashed potatoes instead. Potatoes help keep the bread moist, but aren’t absolutely necessary. Barb@KAF

  16. Alison tee

    As for fillings – I have sprinkled on (after spreading butter on) powdered ranch dressing mix, or parmesan and garlic powder.

    Reply
  17. Kathy

    Two questions.
    1. Is some “magic” to cutting the dough in circles? Would cutting similar sized squares or rectangles would work just as well. That would eliminate the need to reform and re-roll the dough.
    2. While the instructions suggest that the oft-suggested approach (in many cooking blogs) of stacking squares of dough in a pan won’t work as well, that is the approach suggested for muffin pans. So I’m wondering why you don’t use the circle-folded-in-half approach for muffin pans as well?
    Thanks in advance for the insight.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Squares will work just fine- we just like rounded edges for the top of the loaf- they’re less likely to burn. Some people stack them horizontally, but who eats bread from the top down, anyhow? The muffins are similar to the old fashioned butter rolls called Fan-Tans, but are welcome to use the circle folded in half in the muffin pans too. Happy creating! Laurie@KAF

  18. Pam the Goatherd

    Can I skip the potato flour and just use all purpose flour? I am deathly allergic to foods in the nightshade family, which includes potatoes.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Pam, you can certainly leave out the potato flour, but you don’t need to replace it with all-purpose flour. Barb@KAF

  19. Ann

    This looks divine! I will try this but am also looking for something that was similar which had spinach, red peppers and other vegetables in it. I’m wondering about putting the veggies in the center of the discs… hmmm… will have to think about that BUT would also be delighted for your input. The loaf we had came from a bakery in Hershey PA and had a ‘shaggier’ look to it. If you know that break – please share what you know. It was years ago & has haunted me ever since!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      That does sound like a wonderful combo that is reminiscent of a cross between a calzone or stuffed bread and pull apart yeast bread. These days, a simple search with your trusty computer may yield the bakery/location or recipe of your memory. Our best advice it to jump into the kitchen and start experimenting! Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

  20. Lynne

    Here’s a concept: use two different flavored butters, spreading half the circles with one and half with the other. Stack one flavor, like parmesan cheese, at one end of the pan and the other, like garlic herb, at the other.

    Sprinkle each end of the risen loaf with a bit of the flavoring (like [parm | herbs] for the above) to identify which end is which. Make everybody happy! ’cause there always seems to be someone who doesn’t like something 😉

    Can’t wait to try this at Thanksgiving!

    Reply
  21. Karence

    We made these this morning.
    Doubled recipe.
    Made herb loaf. Butter,garlic,rosemary, thyme and sage. IT IS AWESOME.
    Then cheese loaf. Make sure you use s good sharp cheddar.
    Then combination loaf of herb and cheese

    All I can say is going to be weekly. ❤

    Reply
  22. Sophia

    This bread is absolutely delicious, made it last night and between my husband and myself it is almost completely gone this morning! The cook-time came out to be over an hour for me though, any thoughts why that might be?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You’re spot on to observe the loaf before removing from the oven. Look for golden brown color, smells like yeast bread in your kitchen, loaf sounds hollow when tapped and, if you have an instant read thermometer, a temperature of 190′. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

  23. Samana Mustafa

    Delicious pull apart bread. I stuffed crushed garlic, butter, shredded cheese,black pepper, fresh basil. Nothing like this bread.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We haven’t given this a try, but I don’t see this not working. Give it a go! Jon@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      The potato flour is a specialty flour, only available through web, catalog, and in-store sales in Norwich, Vermont. Our Customer Care team will be happy to help you place an order! Laurie@KAF

    2. Brandi

      I didn’t find potato flour in any grocery store in 75 miles. After I gave up I found it in the health food store. 🙂

    3. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re glad to hear you finally found the potato flour so you can get baking! You can always order this item directly from us as well. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  24. Amanda Westbrooks

    I’d love to add sultanas and diced apple to the filling–with butter, pecan bits and cinnamon–rather like a strudel. Can I use a small dice of fresh apple? Or will the extra moisture be an issue?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Your pull apart variation sounds tasty and terrific. We’d love to know what you think after the bake and taste test! Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

    2. The Baker's Hotline

      Soak the apples (brandy, boiled cider, or hot water) to prevent chewy hard bits in the final product, and toss them with sugar and cinnamon. Spread the dough with butter and you’ll have a great sweet dessert bread! Happy baking! Laurie@KAF

  25. Colleen C.

    Is there any difference or advantage working with metal or glass pans? My usual bread pans are well-used dark pans.

    Reply
    1. Posie Harwood , post author

      Both will work fine! It may affect the baking time slightly, so just keep an eye on the bread.

  26. potato queen

    my husband is lactose-intolerant. can you recommend a dairy free variant to use to make the pull-apart loaf?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Use the milk that you CAN tolerate: soy, rice or nut milks can be used one for one in yeast bread recipes. You’re still striving for a soft and supple dough that feels like pressing on your cheek with your index finger. This will also translate to a soft and supple loaf of bread! Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

    1. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Glory,
      Gluten-free breads are much more batter-like in texture, so you wouldn’t really be able to cut and layer them in the same way. But, you could definitely add some herbs to the batter for a lovely flavor. ~ MJ

  27. SusaJayne

    I have something called potato starch from Bob’s Red Mill. Is that the same as potato flour, or can it be used in the recipe? Thanks. Planning to make a Vampire-Repellant Garlic Pull-Apart Bread for a Halloween party!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Potato starch and potato flour are different ingredients that cannot be used interchangeably in recipes (potato flour is the whole potato, dehydrated and ground finely while the starch is just the starch alone). If you are looking for a substitute for potato flour, you can use real mashed potatoes in this recipe! It may seem like a strange ingredient, but it helps to keep the bread moist and fresh for longer. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    1. Posie Harwood , post author

      Mine is a 9″ x 5″ loaf pan (standard size), so anything close to that will work (I’ve made it in my metal 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ pan). Also, if you want to use a smaller pan, you can just cut out smaller circles to fit. Enjoy!

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We recently posted an article on our blog about how to add sourdough starter (of 100% hydration) into your favorite recipes, which would work beautifully with this pull apart bread! Basically you will reduce the flour and water by 4 ounces each if you add in 1 cup of starter. For the full instructions, check out Adding Sourdough To a Recipe post. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We tend to prefer the AP flour for breads designed to be tender. Enjoy and happy baking! Jon@KAF

  28. Catherine Holland

    How long should it typically take for the dough to rise? Is it ok to make this in a kitchen aid with the dough hook? Or mix and knead by hand?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Most breads will take 1-2 hours to rise (in general). This dough can be made by hand, bread machine or mixer. Whichever you prefer! Jon@KAF

  29. Michael S

    I made the muffin pan version, or tried to, for Thanksgiving dinner rolls. I rolled out the rough to be a half inch thick, as the recipe says. That was much thicker than what the photos for the recipe show. I could barely fit three layers of dough into the muffin cups. And the oven spring of the rolls made them about double in size. The resulting bread had a good flavor, but was much more dense than I expected. The second proofing for the rolls was about 30 minutes. My two part question is this: would rolling the dough thinner and giving it a longer second proofing help keep the bread from turning out so dense?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Michael, I think rolling the dough a little thinner may be helpful when making the muffin tin rolls, and giving them a longer second rise should result in lighter textured rolls. I’m wondering if your milk/butter mixture was still a bit too warm when you mixed the rolls, which would cause the dough to rise more rapidly. Be sure to allow the milk/butter mixture to cool to about 110 degrees before proceeding to the next step. Barb@KAF

  30. Sonia

    Someone above mentioned a second proof for a more tender bread. The recipe itself doesn’t indicate this. Kindly clarify when and how the second proofing should take place? Cheers!
    S

    Reply
  31. Pat

    I dip balls in olive oil fresh rosemary moisture and cook in cast iron pan for a bit of a healthier version. Awesome. Get lots of requests for these. Make double so they freeze really well

    Reply
  32. Marla

    I made the recipe based on the blog post and found that the dough was very raw after baking for 25 minutes in a 9″ x 5″ dark metal pan at 350 degrees. I ended up having to bake it for far more than DOUBLE the suggested time of 22-24 min. I came here to read the comments to see if others had the same problem and a few did, but more importantly, I found the original recipe which has the same proportions but says to bake the dough in 2 pans, not 1 as the blog post suggests. Could this be why the dough did not bake as expected?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Marla – Thank you for your comments. Posie illustrates 3 unique outcomes using this basic dough. While adhering to the important techniques here, she did make some minor changes. She used a 9 x 5″ pan instead of a standard sized bread pan (8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″) and opted for a smaller circle measuring 3″ rather than 3 1/2 – 4 “. The most important thing is to keep an eye on the bread. The bake time (as are rising times) is a bench mark. Rely on its appearance and the internal temperature. Shoot for 190 degrees F. Lastly, I recommend an oven thermometer as an extra assurance. Loading a bread into an oven that is not up to temp will significantly impact the total time. I (we) hope you will try again! Elisabeth@KAF

  33. Deborah Haught

    I have two questions about the dough ingredients. Should I use:
    1. Salted or unsalted butter?
    2. Whole milk or is another milk recommended?

    I have been dreaming about this bread since I saw the picture of the Buttery Herb Loaf in the catalog. I can’t wait to make and eat it this weekend.

    Thank you!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We test all of our recipes with unsalted butter, then adding the salt we want into the recipe. For a slightly richer flavor, use whole milk, but your results will be just as lovely with other kinds of milk. Laurie@KAF

  34. Becky C

    I needed to use some sour dough starter…i would suppose that would work in this recipe.. What is your take?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes, you may use some unfed starter in this recipe. Add one cup of unfed starter to replace 1 c. of flour and 1/2 c. of water in the recipe. Happy baking! Elisabeth@KAF

  35. Roberta

    Is this recipe on similar type as the “FAMOUS” store bought “FLAKY BISCUITS”! I would really like to make biscuits or bread like that!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Are you talking about the biscuits that come in a tube? I think the only way you are going to find out, Roberta, is committing yourself to trying this recipe! Let us know what you think. Elisabeth@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Beth, we like Earth Balance vegan buttery baking sticks if you’re looking for something dairy-free and delicious. We haven’t tried coconut oil, but feel free to give it a try if you’re in the mood for some fun baking experiments! Bryanna@KAF

  36. Jessica Cornelius

    Thank you for this awesome recipe! I made the dough in my bread machine, with a few tweaks (used flax egg instead of chicken egg, almond milk instead of cows milk) and I “stuffed” the circles with a heavily herbed olive oil blend. It came out so good! I cant wait to try out sweeter versions!

    Reply
  37. Luna

    Oh my wow this turned out well! I baked a loaf and then a few muffins with the left over dough, all flavored with lemon zest and thyme. The bread is chewy and fluffy and absolutely tasty. I’ll definitely come back to make a savory version!

    Reply
  38. Penny

    I love this recipe and have used it several times — cinnamon sugar is my favorite. I seem to be ending up with excess butter/sugar/cinnamon in the bottom of the pan so I have to promptly remove it. I’m using 1/2 cup softened butter, 1/2 cup sugar and about 1-2 Tbsp. of cinnamon. Do you have any suggestions? Seems like the first time I made it there wasn’t enough flavor!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Some bakers simply shake the small rounds of dough in a bag of cinnamon sugar to coat the dough, others wet the dough with water and then roll in cinnamon sugar mixture. Either of these methods may help you get less excess in the bottom of the pan – especially if you omit the butter. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Lani, if you’d like to make a pumpkin pull-apart loaf, use this recipe for Pumpkin Yeast Bread to make the dough. Then use this technique shown here to shape the loaf into lots of little pieces. Cinnamon-sugar and perhaps a few pecans would make a lovely filling, but if you’re feeling experimental, you’re welcome to spread a bit of sweetened cream cheese between the layers. It might get a little messy, as cream cheese tends to melt as it bakes. Consider adding a few tablespoons of sugar to the filling to help it bind together. Good luck! Kye@KAF

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