Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies: quick, easy and oh-so buttery

When it comes to shortbread cookies, it’s all about the texture and crunch, right? Well, today we’re sharing a gluten-free spin on this classic cookie using almond flour instead of all-purpose flour.

We’ve talked about almond flour before and the many ways you can use it in your baking (gluten-free or not), and these shortbread cookies are a perfect example. The almond flour not only helps to keep them light and tender; but its high fat content means we don’t have to use as much butter as we do in traditional shortbread. But don’t worry, even though there’s less butter, these cookies are still every bit as crunchy, flaky and delicious – just like a true shortbread should be.

But most of all, what we really adore about these cookies is that they only require five ingredients. Yes, five. That’s it!

They’re a cinch to whip up, they bake in under 10 minutes, and really it’s just a bonus that they’re gluten-free. So whether you’re new to gluten-free baking or are just looking for a quick and easy cookie, these almond flour shortbread cookies are sure to be a hit. They truly make the most scrumptious dessert (and pair quite nicely with afternoon tea or coffee, if we do say so ourselves). Enjoy!

Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies via @kingarthurflour

To start, you’ll want to preheat the oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl (or stand mixer), combine:

1 cup almond flour
3 tablespoons softened butter
3 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Mix all of the ingredients together until a cohesive dough forms.

Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies via @kingarthurflour

Scoop 1″ balls of dough onto the prepared baking sheet. You could use a teaspoon cookie scoop or just roll them in your hands. Arrange the balls of dough about 1 1/2″ to 2″ apart, then use a fork to flatten each cookie to about 1/4″ thick, making a crosshatch design.

Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies via @kingarthurflour

Bake the cookies for 8 to 10 minutes, until they start to turn light golden brown on top.

Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies via @kingarthurflour

Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies via @kingarthurflour

Remove the cookies from the oven and cool them on the pan for 10 minutes. Transfer them to a rack to cool completely before serving.

Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies via @kingarthurflour

Read, bake, and review (please) our recipe for Gluten-Free Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies.

Print just the recipe.

Alyssa Rimmer
About

Alyssa grew up in Vermont, attended the University of Vermont and now lives in New York City, where she bakes and writes recipes for her blog Simply Quinoa. She's been living gluten-free for over four years. Alyssa also authors her own food blog and enjoys ...

comments

  1. sandy

    These look like a great year round cookie. I love shortbread and definitely want to try these. Couple of questions first – I have never used almond flour. How much almond flavor will be in the cookie? Also, can the dough be rolled and cut?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      The almond flour lends a subtle, nutty flavor, but it’s not overwhelming. I think you could roll this, but it will most likely be soft and crumbly, similar to rolling a peanut butter cookie dough. I would make sure it’s not too soft, so maybe chill the dough in the fridge first to firm it up a little. Bryanna@KAF

    2. Michelle

      The cookies do have an almond flavor. You can try rolling and cutting the dough, but they are not as “elastic” as cookies made with flour – they are more crumbly. I would recommend just rolling them and pressing them as she did in the recipe. They are very delicious and hard to resist!

    3. Dianne L Barnett

      Good question! Actually, true almond flour is just exactly that, it is real ground up almonds, so the “almond” flavor should me awesome, and there would be no need to use a flavoring or extract, unless it’s something other than almond flavored extract such as vanilla, or cherry, etc.

  2. Kay

    These look lovely! Another great addition to my eternal search for good bake sale recipes. I like the thumbprint variation and it’s nice to have a short ingredient list for these cookies!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Paulie, we don’t test our recipes with alternative sweeteners like Splenda, but we did do a little investigating on the general topic, which you can read about here. As you’ll see, we found that alternative sweeteners tend to work best in relatively low-sugar, high-moisture cookies, and this recipe doesn’t meet either criteria. Bottom line, we can’t recommend the substitution in this recipe, but you’re certainly welcome to give it a try if you’re up for an experiment. Mollie@KAF

  3. Aaron

    What a neat twist on shortbread. Thanks.

    And these would be a good recipe for Passover too so long as you use kosher for Passover confectioners’ sugar.

    Reply
    1. Deb Liebman

      How many cookies does this make? Do you know the calorie and carb breakdown? Can’t wait to try them.

    2. KareninStLouis

      Apparently, you can also make your own powdered sugar with potato starch and granulated sugar, processed in a food processor or coffee/spice grinder. Recipes I’ve seen call for one cup of granulated sugar and 1 teaspoon potato starch (Martha Stewart), or 1/3 cup granulated sugar and half a teaspoon potato starch (Epicurious). That’s what I’m going to try for this recipe.

    3. KareninStLouis

      Oops. My mistake. Martha Stewart’s recipe for Passover powdered sugar is 1 cup of sugar and 1 TABLESPOON of potato starch.

    4. Joy

      For Passover, you might sub 3 TBSP of maple syrup for the sugar. You can also sub grapeseed oil (or canola) for the butter to make them nondairy).

    5. The Baker's Hotline

      Joy, thanks for offering these Passover conversions! I’m a little concerned that the cookies may spread with these changes, so let us know how they turn out! Maple sugar, rather than syrup, might work better, along with a Kosher for Passover margarine. Barb@KAF

  4. Katie

    My brother-in-law raves about this recipe. I plan on trying it asap, but would like to know if the dough can be frozen. If so, can it be wrapped in log shape and then sliced? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Good thinking, Katie. Frozen: yes. Slice and bake: yes. If the dough log slicing is difficult or crumbly – let the log warm slightly then slice and bake. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

  5. wendyb

    I love almond flavors and the texture of nut flours. Could I use hazelnut or pecan flour instead? Thoughts on toasting it prior to baking? (I just made a double recipe of the dough in the food processor with a pinch of almond extract. It’s tucked in the refrigerator to bake tomorrow.)

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Wendy, feel free to use any nut flour you’d like. If you plan to toast the flour, make sure you hover over the oven, because it will burn in a flash! Make sure it is completely cool before using it in the cookie dough. Laurie@KAF

  6. Lana long

    I didn’t see how many recipe makes. I’m thinking double it for goo batch. Sounds deliriously easy.

    Reply
  7. Susan White

    This recipe doesn’t indicate how many cookies it makes. Is it only a dozen? It is helpful to indicate the yield in posting a cookie recipe. Thanks

    Reply
  8. Joan Friedman

    I love almond-tasting baked goods. Could one substitute almond extract (or almond oil) for the vanilla?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Of course- use the same amount of extract, or about 1/4 the amount of oil, for flavoring. Laurie@KAF

  9. Gabrielle Glatt

    Is it possible to substitute honey for the confectioners sugar? If so, what would be the amount of honey to use to get the equivalent sweetness needed?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Gabrielle, we haven’t tried making this recipe with honey, so let us know how they turn out if you experiment. I’m guessing you could use the same amount of honey as recommended for sugar as far as sweetness goes, but this may change the consistency of the cookies and possibly cause some spreading. Barb@KAF

    2. Martha Donohue

      I tried subbing honey & it did spread a little so I added a little more flour and an egg, and they turned out perfect!

    3. Martha Donohue

      I forgot to say that the flour I added to balance the honey, was rice flour. So I used about 3/4 almond flour & 1/4 rice flour. Then it was still coming apart (from honey) when I rolled the dough balls, but then I whisked an egg, added half of the egg, kneaded it in, and then the dough rolled better & stuck together because of the egg.

  10. Lynn Schmidt

    Can’t wait to bake these. My question is, I don’t have almond flour. Could I substitute all purpose flour and add extra almond extract? Can’t see buying almond flour for just a batch or two of these cookies. Thanks.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Lynn, I think you’d be better served following a shortbread recipe written for all-purpose flour. Or if you’re looking for a gluten-free shortbread, here’s a recipe that calls four our gluten-free multi-purpose flour. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jessica, I think the same amount of Earth Balance (the stick form) would work well in this recipe. Barb@KAF

  11. Sharon

    If I am in the mood for a very almondy cookie, would these do well with almond extract? They sound delightful as is and I’m going to try today. I really appreciate the small batch size.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sharon, I think a little almond extract would go very nicely in these cookies. Barb@KAF

  12. Shari

    I just made a batch! Quick, easy, and tastier than typical shortbread thanks to the addition of vanilla. I accidentally melted my butter, and the dough wasn’t crumbly at all. I also rolled my balls in granulated sugar before flattening. I really like them!

    Reply
  13. Donna

    These cookies were just as advertised, quick, easy, crunchy, flaky and delicious. I just wondered if you get the same results if you double the recipe. This was by far one of my favorite recipes using almond flour. My husband loved them and I don ‘t expect them to last very long!

    Reply
  14. Susan

    Easiest and most delicious shortbread recipe. Had all the ingredients at home and made the right away. The shortbread flavor increased as the day went on. A perfect quick cookie!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Karen, I think this recipe would be just fine doubled without any modifications! Bryanna@KAF

  15. Lila

    When a KAF recipe (such as this one) lists “salt” as an ingredient without specifying which type (ie, table vs. kosher), which kind of salt should be used?

    Reply
    1. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Lila,
      We use table salt or fine sea salt in our test kitchens and classrooms. If we use kosher salt, we’ll specify in the recipe. ~MJ

  16. Patricia Robertson

    I made these cookies for my daughter who has celiac disease. She loved them. They were very easy to make. I did add some chopped almonds for a little bit of crunch.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Linda, we don’t yet have any gluten-free recipes for mandelbrot, but we’ll keep it in mind for future recipes! Or you can give it a try on your own! If you do, let us know how it turns out, we love feedback. Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Donald, unfortunately we don’t know the nutritional break down of this recipe. We’re working on adding that information to many of our recipes, but haven’t gotten the chance for this one yet. Bryanna@KAF

  17. Linda

    Can I substitute Splenda sugar substitute for the confectioners sugar? If adding almond extract, do I eliminate the vanilla?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Linda, sugar replacers work better in some recipes than in others. Recipes with higher moisture, like muffins or quick breads, work best. Sugar is not just for flavor and sweetness, but also for overall texture. Changing the sugar changes the entire recipe. That being said, feel free to experiment if you’d like. You can also read our other blog posts about using sugar substitutes called Searching for Sweetness. This might give you some more insight. Happy baking, Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Debra, go ahead and use coconut flour, but keep in mind that it absorbs liquid at a much faster rate than almond flour, so you’ll most likely need more butter or even a touch of water to keep these cookies from getting overly crumbly. Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jennifer, we haven’t tested this out yet, but I think it would be a fine replacement for the butter. Just make sure the coconut oil is soft, to mimic the butter as much as possible. Bryanna@KAF

  18. Joyce Msggiora

    If you add maple syrup to the maple pecan version, do you cut down on the amount of powdered sugar? I watch my sugar intake (due to diabetes), so the basic cookie is relatively low in sugar, but adding the maple syrup increases it significantly. Thank you for a interesting recipe! My other gluten-free almond cookie uses beaten egg white in place of the butter as a binder, making essentially an almond macaroon.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Joyce, you can replace the powdered sugar with the maple sugar to maintain the consistency. These are pretty forgiving cookies, and we want you to be able to enjoy them! Laurie@KAF

  19. Antonia

    Instead of using a fork to press the cookies, I use my “meat tenderizer’ – that hammer-looking thing with two ridged faces, one with larger ‘grid’ ,one with smaller ‘grid’. The larger grid works best. Spray it with cooking spray, dip in in flour, and smush theh balls of dough in one step. Easy!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jennifer, I think the coconut oil would be fine, just make sure it’s soft, to mimic the texture of the butter as much as possible. Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Chris, we don’t have much experience in sugar substitutes, and because we aren’t doctors we can’t give any insight on a nutritional level. But check out our blog posts called Searching For Sweetness for a bit of a deeper look into some sugar alternatives and the impact they have on some baked goods. Bryanna@KAF

    2. Katherine

      Chris, I just made these a couple days ago using Swerve confectioners (powdered erythritol- Glycemic Index of 1) and I substituted one for one. They came out perfect and were so delicious! I made a double-batch and they are already all gone. You can buy Swerve online and in some health foods stores and some grocery stores. (I am diabetic as well. If you only eat a couple, you won’t have to bolus, but if you eat many more, you may need a small bolus as I did.) Happy baking!

    1. Katherine

      I haven’t tried this yet, but my go-to for a powdered sugar substitute is Swerve brand “Confectioners Style” of erythritol sweetener. It subs 1 for 1 with powdered sugar and is a natural, not artificial, sweetener. Splenda would probably work as well, but it is a artificial sweetener and the binding agent they use (to make it substitute 1 for 1 with sugar) is a carby starch (maltodextrin). Happy baking! I’m hoping to make this tomorrow, so if I do, I’ll be using confectioners Swerve and I’ll update my comment 🙂

    2. MaryJane Robbins

      Thanks, Katherine, I’m sure many folks will be eager to hear how it works out. ~ MJ

    3. Katherine

      OK, I made a double batch of these a couple days ago, making it Paleo and low-carb by using softened coconut oil and Swerve Confectioners (powdered erythritol) in place of the butter and sugar. I substituted one for one and they came out perfect! They are already all gone- that’s how good they were! Thanks, King Arthur, for this simple, yummy recipe and for your super-fine almond flour!

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Suzanne, you can use almond meal, just note that it’s coarser than almond flour, so most likely the cookies won’t be as smooth in texture. Bryanna@KAF

  20. Agnes Posner

    I keep buying gluten free cookies but not one of them as good as this. I will try to add some chocolate chips for variety. Also this will be good for Passover too.

    Reply
  21. KareninStLouis

    Tested this recipe today. Made my own kosher for Passover powdered sugar by blending 2/3 cup sugar with 1 tsp potato starch in a food processor for 2 minutes so I’d have a supply. I made a half-batch plain, and a half-batch with the cocoa powder (not the pistachios). I made the criss-cross on all the cookies except two of the plain ones, which I made as thumbprint with strawberry preserves. Each of my half batches made 7 cookies, and took 11 minutes. (Possibly they were a bit larger. I used a #70 scoop.) Very pleased with the results. I plan on making the basic recipe for Passover, 1/3 of them thumbprint. Thanks, KAF!!

    Reply
  22. Phronsie

    This makes 15 VERY small cookies. The recipe is easily doubled. The cookies don’t spread much in baking. I added an extra TBSP of powdered sugar and another 1/8 tsp. Vanilla. I also dipped my fork in granulated sugar to add a bit more sweetness. The cookies, being shortbread, are very crumbly after they are baked. My family likes them cooked just a little browner than your photo. That toasts the almonds a bit. They were a big hit and a definite make again. I think I’ll drizzle them with melted chocolate next time.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We encourage our customer/bakers to use their favorite on-line calculator for calories and nutritionals. Spark peopleis a good resource. Happy baking! Irene@KAF

    2. Avinoam Marcus

      Wonderful for low carb – high fat (banting) diet. Used natural xylitol. With all ingredients for a batch of 16 medium-sized cookies (2 total cups of almond flour) calculated each cookie at 680 kj (162 calories).

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      A typical shortbread recipe uses 1 cup butter, 1 cup confectioners sugar and 2 cups all purpose flour to yield a round pan of shortbread or about 4 dozen small (1 3/8″) drop shortbread cookies. This recipe is simply too small to bake in the shortbread round. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      I think that might be a fine thing to do, Michelle. Keep in mind that it might change the texture and moisture of the cookie, so I would adjust the flour accordingly. Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We haven’t tested coconut sugar as a substitute for the finely ground confectioners sugar. We’d love to hear the results from your test kitchen should you decide to forge ahead with coconut sugar. Happy baking! Irene@KAF

  23. Melanie

    I made these swapping out the confectioners sugar with an equal amount of coconut sugar to make them low carb. I also scrunched 3 sugar-free dark chocolate chips onto each one. Absolutely delicious. Texture is an interesting shortbread / macaroon hybrid. Really simple and fast to make – they will be a regular Sunday baked item for me!

    Reply
  24. Marion

    I have been looking for a substitute for the crust for Great-Granny Leeds’ Butterscotch pie. I want to go out of the box on this, and thought a cookie crust would be a cool thing. Any thoughts on making one giant cookie in the bottom of a pie dish? Little info–the crust is cooked, then the filling added, then topped with meringue and baked again. Thank you for your time.

    Reply
    1. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Marion,
      This should make a great crust. Depending on the size of your pie pan, you may not need all the dough but you can save it and bake the rest as cookies. Let us know how it goes, we love a good butterscotch pie. ~ MJ

  25. Ryan T.

    Could you add a little xanthum gum to make the dough less crumbly! Xanthum does bring elasticity to things when the gluten is not present. I add it to other baked gluten free baked goods to help cakes be less crumbly.

    Reply
    1. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Ryan,
      Sure, you can try a little xanthan in the recipe if you’d like. Let us know how it goes. ~ MJ

  26. Becky

    Wow! I just made a double batch of these and they are fantastic! I used 1/4 teaspoon of almond emulsion and 3/4 teaspoon of vanilla. I can totally envision this becoming a shortbread crust as Marion suggested above. This recipe is a keeper. Thanks KAF!! Between recipes like this and your GF Brownie mix, I can almost forget I’m Celiac. 😉 …..almost. Thanks for all you do…I SO appreciate your creativity!

    Reply
  27. Fluffy

    Outstanding cookies! We modified only one ingredient: took out the sugar and replaced it with the same amount of powdered erythrotol. The sugar lovers I fed it to were impressed that it contained no sugar! Next time I’m adding pecans to make this a pecan sandy cookie.

    New family favorite! Thanks so much!

    Reply
  28. Susan

    Fabulous! Really appreciate a good cookie recipe that doesn’t create too many guilt-inducing trips to the kitchen. This is definitely a keeper. Thanks!

    Reply
  29. Brittany Mahoney

    These are a favorite for my gluten, dairy, soy, and egg free family! We use Earth Balance Soy Free instead of butter and they turn out great. My other favorite modifications are to add 1/2 t of almond extract to the regular recipe.

    Or, I do a chocolate modification. I add 6 T cocoa or cacoa powder. 1 extra T of butter/earth balance and 1-2 extra Ts of powdered sugar.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Carrie, if you want to give this a try, we’d suggest lining the pan with parchment and scoring the dough before you bake it – that should make them easier to cut and move once baked. Enjoy! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sounds like your oven may have been running hot, or perhaps the pan you baked the cookies on conducted heat differently than the ones we use in our test kitchen. Try turning down the temperature by 25°F next time, and check for doneness about 3 minutes early. Baking the cookies in the middle of your oven is the right place. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Good question, Pam. We use a very similar version of this recipe (double the size and calling for a combination of granulated sugar and cornstarch instead of powdered sugar) for the crust in our Gluten-Free Lemon Squares: http://bit.ly/VVof48. Either version will work (the one with additional cornstarch may hold together a tad more), just make sure to double the batch size if you choose to use the cookie recipe. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  30. Judie

    Just made these using Splenda (the baking kind that comes in a bag). These cookies are amazing. By following the rest of the recipe and making 12 cookies – these cookies end up having only 1 carb each. A great snack for folks eating low-carb. Thanks for this recipe. We love these cookies.

    Reply
  31. Dave Aldrich-Thorpe

    I was given a bag of Almond Flour and searched on King Arthur recipes and found your Almond Flour Shortbread Cookies. Will be making those up today and plan to do a 4 o’clock sit-down with a fresh brewed pot of tea. The fact the ingredient list is all of 5 ingredients and the directions seem super simple, I am betting another King Arthur recipe will be in my “that’s a keeper” recipe box.
    Thank you
    Dave

    Reply
  32. jabNY

    Didn’t love these cookies. Not a lot of flavor and the bottoms of mine started burning before the tops had a chance to brown. Too bad.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel

      Sorry these weren’t up to snuff for you. I wonder if you used a dark pan, which could have caused the burned bottoms? PJH

  33. Virginia

    For about half of the batch, I did the recommended cross-hatching with a fork; for the other half, I made a little well in the middle of the rolled cookie ball and put in a dab of raspberry jam (like a Jam Thumbprint cookie). Seriously delicious!

    Reply
  34. Eleanor

    I added some almond extract and made them into thumbprint cookies (with raspberry jam). They were good, but as the recipe is written, I wonder how much flavor it has?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We love the variation you came up with Eleanor! These are shortbread cookies, which classically has a more mild flavor profile than some other cookies you may be used to. The attraction is the pure, simple flavor and the divine melt-in-your-mouth texture. These cookies are also great served with a flavorful tea, coffee, of hot chocolate. Kye@KAF

  35. Carole Mason

    I’m wondering why I can’t print out the recipe; I’m not the computer expert that some of your bakers may be.
    I wrote this one out and I’ll use word because I’m not familiar with any techniques used today.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re sorry to hear that you had trouble printing the recipe, Carole. To do this you’ll want to click on the link for the recipe itself (http://bit.ly/1KgSVVa) and click “print recipe”. Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

  36. Tootise

    I used this recipe but didn’t have powdered sugar I put regular sugar in a coffee grinder and made powder that way. However the cookies disintegrate. I also used coconut oil that was well chilled.
    How can I fix this problem?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We recommend using powdered sugar in this recipe rather than granulated — while pulsing it in your food processor can work in some applications, for this recipe you’ll want to use the real deal. Also, coconut oil may lead to more crumbly cookies. If you’re committed to using it, be sure the oil is nice and soft and workable, and consider adding a bit extra until the dough comes together. Chilling the dough before baking also helps. Good luck! Kye@KAF

  37. Sharon Benton

    This is going to become a go-to recipe for me! Love the texture, the almond flavor and the fact that it does not use a ton of butter! Have made these with chocolate chips, salad caramel nuts, and lime and cilantro. So many possibilities!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sarah, while this substitution works well in some recipes, and it would be fine for flavor here, we suspect it would change the way the cookies bake – think cookies that spread more. You’re certainly welcome to give it a try as long as you’re up for an experiment! Mollie@KAF

  38. Bella White

    Instead of powdered sugar, I used grounded up Natural Sugar that I ground into a power using a Nutra Bullet. I also added a few drops of milk. The cookies turned out great!

    Reply
  39. Roseann

    I’ve made these cookies according to the recipe and they’re beautiful and delicious! Tonight, I decided to make them but had only 2 Tablespoons of butter, so I subbed 1 T Coconut oil.
    The cookies spread out and went flat. They’re still very good, but the butter also tames the sweetness of the confectioner’s sugar.
    I’m just sharing my experience with substitutions.
    Thank you for this recipe!

    Reply
  40. Kathey

    Can I press these into a sheet pan, bake and then cut into squares? Need to make a bunch and don’t want to one-by-one ’em.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      This technique should work, Kathey, just keep in mind that this recipe would need to be doubled to even fill an 8″ square pan. These cookies do also tend to be a bit more crumbly than traditional shortbread, so we’d definitely recommend scoring the pressed dough before baking and cutting while the baked cookie mass is still warm. Good luck and happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  41. Diane

    I made these and pressed them out of a cookie press. I doubled the recipe and it made about 45 cookie press cookies. I also added a little bit of almond extract to the dough to give it a bit more of an almond flavour. They came out really nice. They’re going to be added to my Christmas cookie jar! 🙂

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes, Cathy, these cookies can be frozen either baked or unbaked. Either way, we’d suggest using them within 2-3 months. Mollie@KAF

  42. Lorraine Fina Stevenski

    I made these into little thumbprint cookies and used a local 4 fruit jam as the filling. I formed little balls, rolled them in vanilla sugar, slightly flattened them and then made a small hole for the jam. Perfect for Holiday cookie gifts.

    Reply
  43. Bridget M.

    Everyone really enjoyed these cookies. I used almond extract in place of the vanilla and doubled the recipe. (Even with a double batch, they didn’t last long….) In addition to the plain, cross-hatched ones, I made “thumbprint” cookies with jam in some and mini-chocolate chips in others. All versions were great.

    Reply
  44. Peggy

    I’ve made these cookies 3 times. I found I am intolerant to a rediculous amount of food and spices. I am so thankful for this recipe. I used almond extract instead of vanilla as vanilla is one of my intolerance. Made a strong almond flavor which was so good.
    This time around I used maple syrup and added some soy free dark chocolate chips.
    THANK YOU!!!!!

    Reply
  45. Janet

    I made these and used half vanilla and half almond extract. They were delicious but I only got 10 cookies out of the recipe. And they were tiny! Next time I’ll double the recipe.

    Reply
  46. Luba McNabb

    I read all the reviews before I made these and made notes of people’s changes. I have always had to make changes TILL I made these. They are perfect just the way they are…..no, that’s not totally true. I’m making a second batch right now and tripling the recipe!
    I also used xylitol which I blended to make a powder and they are perfect.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You’d be on the road to a cakier cookie, K, rather than the more traditional, crumbly shortbread you get without egg. If you’re curious, feel free to give it a try and report back! Mollie@KAF

  47. Tracie

    I made these as a bar cookie and topped them with keto friendly chocolate and they were delicious! Next I’m going to use this recipe for a cheese cake crust 🙂

    Reply
    1. Cynthia

      Excellent idea with the crust! I was told to substitute regular flour with almond meal/flour for diabetic cooking so I am always looking for something to help in meal prep specially dessert menu. I will try this for a crust next time I bake!

  48. Julieg

    These sound like such a winner! I’ve been baking gluten free for friends over a year. Some are low carb, diabetic, egg intollarent. . . I plan triangular thumb prints with prune filling, coconut sugar whirred in my coffee grinder with cocoa powder. I made chocolate powder sugar for a chocolate bread pudding, and it was really great!

    Reply
  49. Cynthia

    Just stumbled upon this recipe, made a batch in under 20 minutes and I have to say I am impressed by the results. They were extremely easy to make and very tasty. Thank you!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Kelsie, butter is really what holds this dough together, so it’s important that it’s nice and soft—it will be much more challenging to work cold, hard butter evenly into the dough. It’s also important to measure your almond flour with a light hand, sprinkling it into the cup, rather than packing it in. If you have a scale, using the weight measurements will help ensure that you’re getting exactly the right amount of each ingredient into your mixing bowl. As a last resort, try adding a few drops of water to your dough to pull it together. It shouldn’t be necessary, but it can help, just keep in mind that, unlike with drop cookies, you’re aiming for a somewhat shaggy dough. If you’re still having trouble, consider giving our free Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE. Mollie@KAF

  50. Meri

    WOW! I just made these with almond meal, Earth Balance and almond extract…YUM!! I will be making these again!!

    Reply
  51. maya

    I am so excited to try these, substituting the butter for non dairy spread will make it great for some relatives of mine with allergies. Thanks King Arthur!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Nuz,
      You might be able to use 1 tablespoon of apple sauce in addition to 2 tablespoons of butter and still get good results. We haven’t tested this before, but you’re welcome to give it a shot if you like. It’s important to use at least 2 tablespoons of butter, otherwise the cookies won’t hold together or brown as they should. Good luck! Kye@KAF

  52. Christine

    OMG!!! I’ve been dying to try these and finally got to try it last night. This recipe is sooo easy and sooo tasty and soooo quick! I’m on keto diet so I need to bake my own bread, cookies etc and this really helped my crave for shortbread cookies! I will be baking 3-4 more batches of these cookies today!!

    Thank you for this amazing recipe!

    Reply
  53. PamB.

    I just made these and they are delicious! I doubled the recipe, made them a bit smaller (about 1 & 1/2 ” diameter), and cooked them for 10 minutes. It made 36 cookies. They are so quick to make. They have a slightly nutty buttery flavor and are just sweet enough. My husband was just diagnosed with Celiac Disease and he will love these! A delicious recipe even if you don’t have to be on a special diet.

    Reply
  54. Wendy shipley

    What if i would like to add dried cranberries or chocolate chips or whatever how much would i add

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Wendy, we’d keep the additions to a total of 1/4 – 1/3 cup. If you click over to the recipe page itself, you’ll see a few suggestions for flavor variations that you can use as a guide. Enjoy! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Susan, you can see the full nutrition information (including the carbohydrates) for these cookies by clicking on the orange “Nutrition information” link at the bottom of the At a Glance box on the right hand side of a recipe page. Here’s the direct link to view the recipe, which you’ll see has 3g of carbohydrates for one 11 gram cookie. Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Merwa, you should be able to use another kind of nut flour in this recipe in place of the almond flour if you like. The flavor will change based on the nut flour you choose; toasted nut flour is especially flavorful. This recipe doesn’t need an egg to help bind the dough, but you’re more than welcome to experiment by adding one if you like. The texture will be a bit more cakey than it otherwise would be. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

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