Pane Bianco Bakealong: Challenge #1

bakealong-logoWelcome to our first Bakealong challenge. Each month we’ll announce a new recipe for you to try, along with helpful tips and step-by-step instructions here in our blog. We invite you to bake, then share a photo of your creation, tagging it with #bakealong. Enjoy!

Definition of a baking thrill: Making a loaf of bread that tastes like a great slice of pizza, looks like it was shaped and baked by an expert — and is simplicity itself to execute, no matter your skill level.

We’re talking Pane Bianco, our first Bakealong challenge. Filled with fresh basil, tomatoes, garlic, and shredded cheese, this bread has wonderfully soft texture and is packed with flavor. The unique shape is simple to achieve, and makes an impressive presentation.

While the recipe calls for oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, August is the perfect month to substitute your own home-roasted tomatoes. Pair those tomatoes with basil from your garden, and you’ll never enjoy a fresher-tasting stuffed bread.

Let’s make it! Read all the way through this blog post before you start; we offer some handy test-kitchen tips at the end.

And remember, take #bakealong photos from start to finish; you’ll get some great process shots for Instagram — as well as beauty shots of the final product, of course.

Mix the following together in a bowl:

3 cups King Arthur Unbleached Bread Flour*
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 large egg
1/2 cup lukewarm milk
1/3 cup lukewarm water
3 tablespoons olive oil

*See our tips at the end of this post for substituting all-purpose flour for bread flour.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Knead the dough until it’s fairly smooth and elastic — by hand, using a mixer, or in your bread machine set on the dough cycle. As you can see, the dough will be quite soft.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Lightly grease a bowl or other large container. Put the dough into the container, cover it, and let it rise for about an hour, or until it’s quite puffy; it should just about double in size. I like to use an 8-cup measure to see when it’s doubled, but any large-ish bowl will do.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Gently deflate the dough and round it into a workable ball. Let it rest for 10 minutes or so (no need to cover it). This short rest will relax the dough’s gluten, making it easier to roll/pat out.

While the dough is resting, gather your filling ingredients:

3/4 cup shredded Italian-blend cheese or the cheese of your choice
1/2 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained and diced into 1/2″ pieces; or your own oven-roasted tomatoes, diced
3 to 6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/3 cup chopped fresh basil, green or purple

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Roll and pat the dough into a large rectangle, about 22″ x 8 1/2″. A rolling mat with marked measurements is a big help here.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Spread the dough with the cheese, tomatoes, garlic, and basil; I’m using purple basil here. Note the tomatoes, too; if you use your own tomatoes, make sure they’ve been roasted thoroughly enough that they won’t exude any additional juice as the bread bakes.

Notice the quantity of filling seems rather spare. No, it’s not because I’m a culinary ascetic, but because too much stuffing can lead to a misshapen, messy looking loaf.

Starting with one long edge, roll the dough into a log the long way.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Pinch the edges to seal. Place the log seam-side down on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet.

Using kitchen shears, start 1/2″ from one end and cut the log lengthwise down the center about 1″ deep, to within 1/2″ of the other end.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

Keeping the cut side up, form an “S” shape. Tuck both ends under the center of the S to form a figure-8; pinch the ends together gently to seal.

Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, 45 to 60 minutes.

While the loaf is rising, preheat the oven to 350°F.

Uncover the bread, and bake it for 35 to 40 minutes, tenting it with foil after 25 to 30 minutes to prevent over-browning. When it’s done, remove the bread from the oven and transfer it to a rack to cool.

Pane Bianco Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

See how colorful the bread looks using green basil? While I love the flavor of purple basil, green is definitely more attractive. For even greater visual impact, sprinkle additional chopped fresh basil over the loaf once it’s out of the oven.

Enjoy warm or at room temperature.

So, our first Bakealong challenge looks entirely do-able, right? Trust me, it is. I’ve made this bread several times in the last few weeks, sometimes adding other ingredients — diced black olives, or artichoke tapenade. Just make sure you don’t add TOO much filling. Speaking of:

Pane Bianco Bakealong tips

  • Don’t want to use bread flour? The bread may not hold its shape quite as well, but feel free to substitute all-purpose flour 1:1 for the bread flour in the recipe. Reduce the water to 1/4 cup.
  • Don’t be tempted to go heavy on the fillings; over-stuffing this bread will create a messy-looking loaf.
  • Be careful not to let the bread rise too long; over-risen bread will lose its shape.
  • Some of the filling will be exposed as the bread bakes, which means it may char. When shaping the loaf, tuck any larger pieces of tomato or basil down into the dough. And keep your eye on it. When the loaf is a light golden brown, tent it with aluminum foil to protect the filling from burning.
  • Are you baking gluten-free? Try our Gluten-Free Focaccia, following the tip for adding filling.

Are you ready to make Pane Bianco and join our Bakealong challenge? Print the recipe.

Pane Bianco #Bakealong via @kingarthurflour

We hope you’ve enjoyed your first Bakealong challenge. Be sure to check back on Sept. 1 for our second challenge, another “looks expert, totally simple” treat featuring a favorite fall flavor: pumpkin.

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!

comments

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Sylvia,
      Yes, feel free to use your favorite non-dairy milk in this recipe to make it dairy free. Soy, almond, coconut, and rice milk are all great options. Just be sure to use an unsweetened, unflavored variety for best results. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    2. Diane Taylor

      I don’t bake on a regular basis. This was an easy recipe and the results were a big hit to family and friends. Turned out great!!!

    3. Carrie Hughes

      Just made this and it was delicious! I stuffed it with ground beef, onions, chopped pepperoni and a touch of tomato sauce, then sprinkled sharp cheddar on top. Also used pizza seasoning in the mix. Will definitely make this again

  1. Karmy

    Hi,
    I’m a bit confused. I just read in the KAF blog that yeast doesn’t like garlic or cinnamon and that they should be used as toppings yet garlic is used here inside the bread. Can you explain the discrepancy?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Karmy,
      The garlic goes in the filling, not the in dough. So no need to worry about the rise–the dough will turn out beautifully! Kye@KAF

    1. cicely smith

      i’ve dried plum tomatoes in a dehydrator

      and, the internet says you can easily dry them in the oven!

  2. Bill Lundy

    I like the concept of the challenge and am interested to try it, but I’d like to have the option of using weights (grams). Can the recipe be made available with weights as well as volumes?

    Reply
  3. J M Cornwell

    It needs olives. Either oil cured olives, dried olives, or black olives — maybe with gorgonzola fillings? — but olives to balance those flavors and add a bit of zing.

    Reply
    1. Barbara Heimowitz

      For the cheese, I used some flecked with olives (from Trader Joe’s). It really added another dimension!

    2. Whiskerwerx

      Yup, next time out I shall add sliced black olives. I used Manchego and goat Cheddar which will do very nicely indeed with olives

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re so glad to hear that, Lorraine! We’ll be sending out an announcement to launch the new Bakealong campaign later this week, in which we’ll be asking you to share your photos on social media with #bakealong. Stay tuned for more details! Mollie@KAF

  4. Finnegan

    This is a great idea, PJ. Count me in. I can’t wait to see everyone’s pictures of their Pana Bianco and taste mine.

    Reply
  5. Mary

    Can you give us a hint on how to pinch the ends together on the underside without spilling all the filling out :-)?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      It’s more of a tucking motion, Mary rather than a true sealing of the ends. It’s not crucial for the two ends to touch each other–they should just be tucked underneath the upper part of the figure 8 enough so that they won’t unfurl during baking. Pinching each end of the roll closed first helps makes this an easy maneuver. Thanks for baking along with us! Kye@KAF

  6. SarahD

    Suggestions for how to use some whole wheat (or white whole wheat) flour in this? Nothing gets baked with all white flour in our house.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Sarah,
      We’re happy to hear you’re eager to bake along with us! You are welcome to try using whole wheat flour to make the dough; we recommend using white whole wheat so the flavor of the filling doesn’t have to compete with an assertive whole wheat flavor. Use the same amount of flour and mix the dough together just enough so that it forms a shaggy mass and then allow it to rest for 15-20 minutes before kneading for the first time. This rest period allows the whole wheat flavor to fully hydrate, which makes it easier to shape and promotes a better rise. We hope you share a photo of your loaf with us on social media! Can’t wait to see the results. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    2. Patty G

      I was going to ask about using whole wheat flour too. Will all whole wheat work? I’m trying to not eat any white flour.

    3. The Baker's Hotline

      Patty, we’d suggest opting for our White Whole Wheat Flour and making sure to add the rest time, as Kye mentioned above. When using 100$ whole wheat flour of any kind, you may also find that you need a little extra liquid to achieve the desired dough consistency. Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

    4. Patty G

      Thanks for the clarification! I have the roasted tomatoes, now I just need to wait for a cooler day. It’s too blasted hot to turn the oven on right now!

  7. Brenda

    Thank you for having this #bakealong! This comes just at the right time because I’m working on bread making skills.

    Reply
  8. Anne

    I have gone a bit crazy with bread baking this summer. Big order of different flours from KAF is currently enroute to my home 🙂 This looks wonderful and I picked my first red tomato off the vine today (I have had several yellow cherry tomatoes but they haven’t made it as far as the house!) As soon as I get enough to roast I am going to give this one a try. I love the idea of the “Bakealong.” Thanks!

    If I don’t have bread flour would All-purpose or Artisan flour be a better alternative?

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel , post author

      Either is fine, Anne – you’d just want to reduce the water to 1/4 cup to account for those flours’ lower protein. Enjoy – and don’t forget to share your beauty shots via #bakealong! PJH

  9. Pam parsons

    I would love to do this bit I am in the middle of moving out of state. But I will try it when I get I get settled.

    Reply
  10. Jane Applegate

    I’m ready to give this a try but I have only buttermilk in the frig right now. Can I use that in place of the regular milk?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jane, using lukewarm buttermilk instead of regular milk should work fine in this recipe. Barb@KAF

  11. Lorraine Fina Stevenski

    This recipe looked so delicious I just had to make it. So great as an appetizer. But I also had to add a few of my own ideas. First I used my food processor to make the dough. SO EASY! The bread rose perfectly in 1 hour. I used homemade roasted tomato pesto, lots of fresh basil, fresh spinach and a 5 cheese shredded blend. And then a sprinkle of Grana Padano cheese on top. I didn’t tuck and left the S snake. Served it with marinara on the side for dipping. The result was delicious. The bread is not like pizza dough, but is a very flavorful soft bread. But next time….I will bake the bread more. I will increase the stuffing and add more flavors. Maybe cooked sausage, peppers and onions? I will think of a new shape! Maybe a longer roll shaped into a round tight coil so it can be cut into wedges? I love experiments!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re so glad you’re having so much fun with this, Lorraine! If you’re instagram, please be sure to post your photos with #bakealong so we can celebrate your success with you! Mollie@KAF

  12. Julie Kenward

    This sounds like so much fun! Can you explain how to dry out our homegrown tomatoes for this bread? I’m assuming they need to be thinly sliced (skin on or off?) but don’t know for how long or at what temperature to bake them. I am also picking my first tomatoes from the garden and would love to use them!

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid

      Julie, I don’t know if you have a convection oven, but if you do, this is its time to shine. Spray a cooling rack with nonstick spray. Slice your tomatoes in half if they’re cherry, or in 1/4″ slices if they’re not. Arrange them on the rack over a baking sheet, and sprinkle lightly with salt. Turn your oven on as low as it will go (this is usually about 170°F). If you have convection, turn it on at the lowest fan speed (usually convection bake). Put your tomatoes in the oven and check them after an hour. They’ll start to get wrinkly and begin shrinking. Depending on how fast they go, keep checking them every half hour until you have slices with a concentrated flavor that are chewy but not hard. Susan

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Kimberly, I wouldn’t recommend freezing this bread unbaked, but you could certainly freeze the baked bread. Barb@KAF

    1. TxRose

      one of my dogs is a tomato stealer too. When he was a puppy he would eat them while they were still green but his taste buds developed and now he waits for the red to show up. Thought dogs were color blind?

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Carolyn, we hope the feeling of accomplishment that comes from baking something elegant and new and the joy that comes from sharing your success with others will be prize enough. Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Good question, Julie. We test all of our recipes with a regular oven, just like the ones most of us have at home. If you are baking with a convection oven, you’ll want to make your usual adaptations to time and temp. Mollie@KAF

    2. Brandon C

      Mollie, your reply gave me pause. I have recently finished a full kitchen remodel, and now have a fabulous set of wall ovens, one is convection. I prefer the convection one, and use it all the time. However, I’m not sure about your comment of making “your usual adaptations of time and temp,” as I haven’t read anything in my owner’s documentation about such adjustments. Would you mind expanding on that a little? According to my owner’s manual, the oven has a built in “recipe correction” that keeps from having to do that (I just am not sure).
      Thanks!

    3. The Baker's Hotline

      Brandon, convection ovens bake more quickly than conventional ovens, so often you need to set convection ovens 25° lower than the recipe suggests and check your bake early (about 2/3-3/4 of the way through to be safe). Some do have a built in correction like you’re describing, however, which should mean you can use the oven temp and times suggested in the recipe. Since they do vary, the best thing would be to use yours as the owner’s manual suggests. Hope this helps to clarify. Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re so glad you’re interested, Sue! It’s tough for us to test individual recipes for high altitude adjustments since we’re not at altitude ourselves, but we do have a guide that can walk you through some of the changes you might want to consider: http://bit.ly/1Q8EFzZ Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

    2. S

      I made this against my better judgement at 7400 ft without any adjustments and it turned out beautifully! I mixed the dough in my bread machine and it doubled in about 40 min then I left it about 40 minutes after shaping. I baked it 40 minutes, tenting with foil after 15 min as the filling did start to brown quickly. Thank you for the clear & concise directions. This was such a fun project. Looking forward to next month!

  13. Candace Edwards

    I’m concerned about adapting this recipe for high altitude. I live in Santa Fe at about 7500ft. Any tips?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We hear you, Candace. As we mentioned above, we haven’t tested this specific recipe for altitude, but we do have a great guide that can walk you through some of the changes you might want to consider: http://bit.ly/1Q8EFzZ Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

  14. Carol

    Is it possible to dice pepperoni, and add that in to filling? Hubby won’t eat it without…. 🙂 Can’t wait to try it!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Of course, Carol! As the recipe notes, just be careful not to go overboard on the fillings, as it may fall apart a bit if you do. Enjoy! Mollie@KAF

  15. kathleen kerr

    Do you butter it after slicing? Dip it in EVOO? Or serve as is? I want to take it to work and would like to know if I should take butter along.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      All sound like delicious options, Kathleen! We also loved it dipped in a spiced up version of the leftover oil from our jar of sundried tomatoes. Mollie@KAF

  16. John Fischer

    I’m a new baker and still nervous and unsure about kneading. Can you give an approximate time for kneading this dough in a stand mixer?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Even the most experienced baker worries about this with new recipes, John! We’ve found that 4-7 minutes at a low speed will generally do the trick. More than time, though, keep an eye out for the visual cues indicated in the recipe – in this case something soft and very smooth that sticks a little to the bottom of the bowl. Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for checking, Dianne. You’ll see that we’ve provided a suggestion for adding filling to our Gluten Free Focaccia: http://bit.ly/2b9KgFg as an alternative for this recipe. Here’s a link to some of our other gluten-free bread recipes you might also enjoy: http://bit.ly/1F4HJJK Happy gf baking to you! Mollie@KAF

  17. Charlotte Nydegger

    Once again KA offers a truly helpful opportunity to become a better baker. I will look forward to each month’s offering.

    Reply
  18. geri

    if i used fresh tomato’s, sliced and drained for a bit. Would they still be to “wet” to use, and would they not be cooked enough after it is done baking? Love this idea. Thank you Geri

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      They’ll definitely still be wetter than roasted or sun-dried tomatoes, Geri, but it doesn’t mean you couldn’t use them. In addition to draining well, take care to dice small and not overload your dough. Mollie@KAF

    2. Margy

      When I use fresh tomato for something like this, I try to squeeze out as much of the seeds and and jelly as I can, chop, salt, them allow to drain between paper towels for a few hours, changing the towels as needed. It doesn’t get rid of all of the moisture, but it helps.

  19. Reba - Lybolt

    cannot wait to try it, problem need to wait for temperatures to cool down.
    right now it is too hot at 90

    Reply
  20. Beverly Parrish

    I have baked since I was only 7 years old and that gives me 65 years of experience. I am eager to try this loaf to impress my family but I am not into Social Media and don’t know quite how that works. Is it possible to email you some photos when I get this done? If you want, I give you permission to use the photos any way you want.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re happy to hear that you’re eager to participate, Beverly! You can absolutely bakealong with us without sharing photos on social media. We’ll be happy to share in your baking success over email and would encourage you to share pictures (or the final baked good itself!) with friends and family too. Feel free to send any photos to: customercare@kingarthurflour.com. Mollie@KAF

  21. Jean

    Sounds great. Can you use fresh tomatoes instead of sun dried. I have several tomato plants and never have dried any, so would like to use fresh.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sure thing, Jean, but given that they will have a LOT more liquid, you’ll want to be sure to finely dice and fully drain them. You may also want to consider using slightly less for the same reason. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      It’s easiest to do the final shaping on whatever you’re going to bake on, and transferring to a pizza stone may be challenging. For best results, we recommend a lightly greased or parchment lined baking sheet. Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

  22. Kimmi

    Looks delicious! I think I’m going to play with the filling a bit and use sautéed apples and mushrooms, caramelized onions and gruyere for a French flair as opposed to the Italian suggested here. Sigh. I love to bake, but I wish there were more people in my house to bake for. This loaf will last the two of us almost two weeks IF I plan to use it over several dinners!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Those alterations sound totally delicious, Kimmi! Time for a dinner party perhaps? Mollie@KAF

  23. Barbara A.

    Do leftovers (assuming there are some) need to be refrigerated? How long can this be left at room temperature? Looks yummy.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      No need to put the loaf in the fridge, Barbara. Just wrap it well and it will stay perfectly tasty at room temp for several days.
      Bryanna@KAF

    2. Annabel Knight

      Please don’t put your bread in the fridge! Starches stale most quickly at 40oF — that’s refrigrator temperature. We store fresh bread cut-side-down on the cutting board, or you could tuck it into a paper bag.

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Lucky you, Sharon! There are lots of variations on this technique, but generally speaking you toss the halved cherry or diced whole tomatoes with olive oil and salt (and any spiced you desire), then spread them on a greased or parchment lined baking sheet and roast in a preheated oven until they soften and begin to brown. Exact baking temps and times will vary based on the size of your tomatoes, but 400° for 20-30 minutes will usually do the trick. Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      It varies from blend to blend, Kate, but yes, usually some mix of parmesan, mozzarella, romano, asiago, provolone and/or fontina. For this, you can use any, all or none of these – whatever you like best! Mollie@KAF

  24. Eileen

    I am going to give this a try. Haven’t made bread in a very long time. I’m up for the challenge. Is instant yeast the same as rapid rise yeast? I never cared much for the taste of bread made with rapid rise yeast. Can I use regular active yeast instead?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Eileen, you can certainly substitute active dry yeast for the instant yeast called for in this recipe. I would recommend adding it to the lukewarm liquid in the recipe and allowing it to sit for 15 minutes before adding the remaining ingredients. Technically, this is no longer necessary, but I’m a little old school that way. Rapid rise is a certain variety of instant yeast that we don’t usually recommend, as we’ve found this type of yeast loses rising power after the first rise. Barb@KAF

  25. Lori Jump

    Dough is rising…can’t wait to see and taste the end result! and I love the idea of a Bakealong ~ can’t wait to see what’s next!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Amber, unfortunately this kind of bread recipe is very difficult to replicate with gluten-free flour. How about adding some basil and sundried tomatoes to this Gluten-free Focaccia recipe, to give you a similarly flavored gluten-free savory treat? Barb@KAF

  26. AnneC

    Can you give me more direction on the cutting? You don’t want to cut through the bottom of the loaf but just through the top layer, is that correct? And then you just fold the ends underneath to make the S shape. Looking forward to making this!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Anne, correct! You’ll want to cut about an inch deep through the top of the loaf, but not all the way through. Barb@KAF

  27. Jane

    This sounds like great fun. Now I have a reason to use my new dehydrator for the garden tomatoes. Can’t wait to get started and see how mine turns out!

    Reply
  28. Peggy

    Can’t wait to try this and put the abundant cherry tomatoes and basil from my garden to a good use.

    Can I refrigerate the dough for two days to enhance the flavor?

    Also, if I halve the recipe how long should I bake it for?

    Thanks for thinking up the bake-along challenge. What fun!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Peggy, if you plan to refrigerate the dough for 2 days, I would put it straight into the refrigerator after mixing and kneading. Deflate the dough and reshape it once or twice while it’s in the refrigerator, if it rises significantly. This recipe makes one nice sized loaf, so I wouldn’t recommend dividing it in half, but if you do choose to bake a smaller loaf, it will likely bake for around 25-30 minutes. Barb@KAF

  29. Jane , Chelmsford, MA

    This sounds fabulous! I love the elegant shape and rustic flavors!! I am traveling this weekend but can plan to do next weekend. If I were to do the mixing and kneading all by hand Would results still be good?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes, Anita. For every one cup of fed sourdough starter, subtract 1 cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water from the original recipe.
      Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jan, you can certainly use garlic powder in this recipe, or leave the garlic out completely. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Kathy, I think it would be fine to freeze the baked bread, but I wouldn’t recommend freezing the unbaked dough. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Pamela, I think it would be fine to use our white whole wheat flour for up to half the flour content in this recipe. Add an extra tablespoon of water to the recipe, and once you’ve mixed all the ingredients until everything is fully moistened (no dry pockets of flour), cover the bowl and allow the dough to sit for 30 minutes before beginning to knead. This pause will allow the bran in the whole wheat flour to fully hydrate and will give you a more productive kneading process. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Trish, when using instant yeast the temperature of the liquid can be room temperature or even cooler. Depending on how warm your kitchen is this time of year, you may want to use liquid in the 80-90°F range, so the dough temperature doesn’t end up being too warm. Yeast will die at 140°F, so we never recommend using water that is hotter than 120°F. Barb@KAF

  30. Barbara Heimowitz

    This is one of the best breads I’ve made! I used a combination of olive flecked cheese and parmesan. I also had some basil infused olive oil which I used. The bread was easy to make and really, really delicious!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Dan, yes, drain the sun-dried tomatoes and pat them dry with a paper towel before snipping them into smaller pieces with your kitchen shears. Barb@KAF

  31. linda lucas

    Hi,
    So looking forward to doing this challenge, and have read all the reviews and am a bit confused… On the recipe website some folks halved the recipe to make one loaf, and the yield is only one loaf. Thoughts on that?
    Also, if I add two teaspoons of vital wheat gluten to AP flour will that mimic the structure of bread flour? And can I use 240 grams of AP flour and 120 grams of white whole wheat flour without changes to hydration?
    BTW, thanks for all your posts, blogs, tips and techniques.. they are terrific!
    Linda from Delaware

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Linda, I wouldn’t worry about adding the vital wheat gluten when using all-purpose flour; just reduce the water content to 1/4 cup instead of 1/3 cup. The all-purpose flour will still give you great results. The recipe as currently posted on our website only makes one loaf. I believe the reviewer may have been responding to an earlier posting of this recipe. This recipe will work fine with the white whole wheat flour along with your all-purpose. If the dough feels a little stiff, feel free to add about 1 tablespoon extra water. Barb@KAF

  32. Sarah

    I saw this in the email yesterday and thought it looked like the perfect addition to the salad supper I had planned. I roasted diced fresh tomatoes at about 400 degrees until they started to carmelize (30ish minutes), and for the cheese I used the Mexican four cheese blend I always have on hand plus a little fresh Parmesan. Turned out very nicely. First thing hubby asked was if there was pepperoni in it, so I think I’ll try that next time.

    Reply
  33. Gail

    What a great idea! Hope you do a gluten free bake along. That would be a real challenge. Gluten free baking is so frustrating. Would rather bake “normal” anyday. Wish gluten free baking was as rewarding.

    Reply
  34. Carol S

    This looks yummy and hubby loves fresh baked bread. Unfortunately, I’m not sure when I’ll be able to bake it as my sciatic nerve has been acting up the past week. But I shared the Bake Along page to Facebook.

    Reply
  35. rocio gomez

    Congratulations I love your recipies and now this seccion step by step wooouu¡¡¡ is wonderfull. Thanks and thanks

    Since Cancun, Mexico a big hug.

    Reply
  36. Andrea Farmer

    I’m so excited to try this recipe tonight! The combinations for fillings….oh my :o)! Thank you for new inspiration, as always!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Carol, if you want to use white whole wheat flour, we suggest using it in a 50/50 ratio with the all-purpose flour. That way you won’t need to make any liquid adjustments. If you use bread flour, simply use the same amount.
      Bryanna@KAF

  37. Janna S

    Thank you so much for offering a bake-along! This sounds like such fun and you get to eat the finished product! I live with my daughter and her family, and they often have visitors in the evening, and this will make a perfect snack to offer. Going to the store today and will pick up needed ingredients. Can’t wait to try this!

    Reply
  38. Charise Linke

    If I wanted to add some sliced dry cured olives to the filling what would you recommend as far as the amount? I was thinking about decreasing the tomatoes by about an 1/8 a cup and adding about 1/4 a cup of the olives. I don’t mind a bit of a messy looking loaf. 😉

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      One of our bakers here used olives, and she said 1/4 cup was the perfect amount, for her anyway. So maybe start there and increase or decreased based on the results and your personal tastes!
      Bryanna@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Erika,
      You can go ahead and use any bread dough recipe you like, even sourdough; it’s more the shaping and filling that sets this bread apart. This recipe makes a really nice soft, light-textured dough, and using sourdough without yeast might produce a less tender result, but you’re welcome to try. Feel free to use your favorite (yeast-free) bread dough recipe or try our recipe for Extra-tangy Sourdough Bread. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  39. Virginia Clifford

    I am going to take the challenge, and hope my 11 year old granddaughter will also take the challenge.

    Reply
  40. Farah

    This will be my Weekend project this week. I will be using part wholewheat part white flour. Do we keep the yeast amount same? I have some fresh green garlic chives growing and basil will be using them.
    Another query can I use mozerella or cheddar?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes, go ahead and keep the amount of yeast the same. You can use either of these cheeses if you have them on hand, they will both pair nicely with the fresh herbs you have!
      Bryanna@KAF

  41. Happy baker

    What the heck is Italian-blend cheese? I get you can use other cheeses but without a sense of what the original idea is it is much harder to substitute appropriately. Is it a cheese that should melt, a creamy cheese, a sharp cheese…?

    Reply
  42. Dona

    I am attempting this recipe using my bread machine to mix the dough. After placing the dough in a bowl to double, it had not risen one bit after an hour. I keep my instant yeast in the freezer, is that a mistake? I went to the store and bought more yeast and I’m trying again. But at this point I guess I was frazzled, I added 2 teaspoons kosher salt instead of 1 1/4 teaspoon. Is this batch ruined?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Dona, it sounds like something was definitely amiss with the first batch if you weren’t seeing any rise in an hour. Keeping yeast in the freezer is perfectly ok, as long as it’s stored airtight, but it sounds like trying with fresh yeast was still a good idea. You’ve probably already decided to move ahead or not with your second batch, but we wouldn’t worry too much about that amount of salt. You may find the final product a little saltier than intended, but when using larger grains of salt like kosher salt, you’ll often need more than what a recipe calls for anyways. We hope things turned out well and would be curious to hear and/or see! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes! Go ahead and post your pictures of the bread on our Facebook page!
      Bryanna@KAF

  43. Laura by the bay

    I love this idea. After the first rise, I had to go out so stored dough in fridge. When I take it out, how long do you suggest it sits at room temperature before shaping and adding the filling. Thank you

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Laura, go by the size and look of your dough, not the time. The dough should be just about doubled in size, and very puffy and soft. Bryanna@KAF

  44. Anita Segreti

    Thanks for the challenge. I will try it very soon. I kind of feel like I am being included in “the club”. Thanks so much. What a nice idea!

    Reply
  45. Anita remple

    I made it!
    Haven’t cut into it yet.
    I’m going to freeze it and take it for one of my meals on a trail ride in Yellowstone National Park next week.
    Can’t wait to share it, looks yummy, smells delicious !

    Reply
  46. Margie Rasmussen

    I have re read this recipe several times and I don’t find any sweetener listed. I am afraid to have a failure. I have all ways put something sweet to make the yeast rise.
    It looks and sounds delicious.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Margie, no sweetness needed to make this dough rise! Give it a go and let us know how it turns out.
      Bryanna@KAF

  47. Ivana

    This looks so good. I’ll be drying tomatoes tomorrow a.m. Basil is abundant in the garden and I believe I have a great cheese to use. Anything that looks this good should taste great.

    Reply
  48. Amy

    I baked this on a whim today for dinner guests tonight. SUPER easy and SO impressive! Love!! Instagrammed and tagged. : )

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Laurie, we based the nutritional info provided off of a serving size of one slice, expecting that the loaf will give you roughly 20 slices. Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

  49. Jane

    Great challenge! I made may first Pane Bianco bread this morning – it certainly will not be the last! I found the recipe easy to follow and the notes were very helpful. Looking forward to the next challenge!

    Reply
  50. Stephanie B.

    This is such an amazing idea to offer a challenge to help us at home bakers enhance our skills! I have never made bread before so can you tell me what type of milk is best for the best results. We always have skim milk on hand, but is 1 or 2% best? Can’t wait to start baking! Thanks!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Good question, Stephanie. We assume 1% milk in our recipes because it’s one of the most commonly kept at home, but truthfully, they all work equally well in bread dough, so you should feel free to use whichever you have on hand. Enjoy the challenge and remember to share your results with #bakealong! Mollie@KAF

  51. Karen

    My loaf is just sitting for the second rise step. I oven roasted some tomatoes from my plants and basil from my (very) mini herb garden pot. Looking forward to seeing how this works out.

    Reply
  52. Jen

    I can’t wait! It’s a million degrees here now and I’m not about to turn on the oven, but one of these days . . . hopefully before the end of the month so I can join in the bakealong fun!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jen, whenever you make it, we hope you’ll still share your results with #bakealong! Mollie@KAF

  53. Teresita Olson

    Excited to join the bake along. Looks yummy and versatile bread. Can I use a sourdough starter as part of recipe? Also, does it matter if I use sun dried tomatoes not packed in oil?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Teresita, you can use sourdough starter in this recipe, yes. For every one cup (8 ounces) of fed starter, you want to subtract 1/2 cup of water (4 ounces) and 1 scant cup of flour (4 ounces) from the original recipe. And yes, you can use tomatoes that have not been packed in oil.
      Bryanna@KAF

  54. Jean

    This was beautiful! However, although the dough easily stretched out to the 22″, it absolutely refused to stretch to more than about 4-5″ width-wise. I nevertheless tried to get 3 rolls out of that after adding the filling, but sadly when we cut it the bread (from several angles), the ingredients were not disbursed throughout the bread at all, not even a little bit. It was quite a disappointment.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re sorry to hear you had trouble with the shaping of this loaf, Jean. It sounds like there might be some confusion about creating 3 rolls — the dough should be rolled out into one 22″ x 8 1/2″ rectangle. The filling is then spread across the surface of the dough and rolled up into one long, 22″ tube. The tube is then sliced open with scissors to reveal the insides and then coaxed into a “S” or figure 8 shape. We’d be happy to explain this in more detail if you like; just give our Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE(2253). I hope that helps! Kye@KAF

  55. Rae

    Made this today for a small gathering and it was amazing. Lasted all of five minutes and I pretty much wanted to make another one right away. Now I’m thinking about different fillings and wondering if I could make a sweet loaf as well as the savory. I love the bake along idea too!

    Reply
  56. RI Baker

    After reading about the various additions, and thinking about pizzas with similar ingredients, we got to wondering about adding spinach. If we did, would you recommend using it uncooked (it’s baby spinach) or cooked (probably w/ oil and garlic) and the excess moisture pressed dry? Thanks for the advice.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      I think I would cook the spinach down a bit before adding it as a feeling to help get rid of some of the water and so it’s less likely to burn and become brittle.
      Bryanna@KAF

  57. Homebaker in Hawaii

    Just love the idea of the Bakealong! I’m excited to give this recipe a try and see if it looks as pictured. Whose idea was it? It’s genius!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re not sure exactly, but like most good ideas, it originated from a melding of the minds. We’re so happy that you’re eager to try it and will look forward to seeing your results! Mollie@KAF

  58. Michelle

    I did it! I turned on the oven, baked that delicious bread (while painting my daughter’s closet – why do I do this to myself?!) and served it for dinner with tomato sauce, roasted tomatoes and basil from the garden. Delicious! I love the concept of the challenge, count me in!

    Reply
  59. JBriz

    I just made my first attempt at this bread and it was wonderful!! I followed the recipe and was quite pleased. We ate it with a meal of mushroom bolognese and the bread was a nice addition to the dinner. We tried the bread with butter, EVOO and simply dipping it in the bolognese sauce…all of which was wonderful. May try a panini tomorrow. Also looking forward to trying different additions to the bread…maybe olives, different cheeses, etc. Love this challenge!!! Thank you so much!

    Reply
  60. marie

    Once i saw this recipe I knew I had to try it. Just got to eat it and wow. So fresh and so delicious, definitely a keeper. Have gotten a few recipes on this site and the instructions are are spot on. Takes the fear of bread making away. Thank you and keep the wonderful recipes coming.

    Reply
  61. Kim

    I made this today despite the 110 degree heat index. I’m always very anxious to try recipes using my home grown basil. I roasted my own tomatoes and it was soooo delicious!

    Reply
  62. Judy

    My loaf came out beautiful and tasty. Great way to use basil from our garden. Can’t wait to see next month’s recipe.

    Reply
  63. JoAnn Cude

    I made this today after getting the email with the recipe. It turned out great. Not on social media so I guess you won’t see my photos. It was delicious.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re so pleased you enjoyed it, JoAnn! In lieu of social media, we hope you’ll share some pics and/or the real deal with fiends/family/neighbors. You should also feel free to email us a pic or two so we can send you a virtual pat on the back! Mollie@KAF

  64. Beatrice Didio

    I have seen tsp. measurements often for yeast. Is 2 tsp. the standard amount in a package of dry yeast? Is the refrigerated cube of yeast the same as packaged dry yeast. Thank You for the recipe and your help.
    B. Didio

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Beatrice, one packet of dry yeast is equal to 2 1/4 tsp. The cake yeast, or the refrigerated yeast, is hardly used anymore and doesn’t convert well to more up-to-date recipes. Usually one pack of those is equal to 2 ounces.
      Bryanna@KAF

  65. kay43026

    Oh.My.Goodness. This bread is AMAZING!!

    I made it yesterday for dinner guests & it was a huge hit. We dipped it in (good) olive oil. Hubs isn’t a huge fan of fresh basil so I only used a little bit…but then sprinkled with some of KA’s Pizza Seasoning. Yummm

    Leftovers today are going to be toasted/grilled…can’t decide if it should be a grilled cheese sandwich or just a nice piece of garlic bread to go with dinner.

    I will definitely be making this again. I loved the soft texture the milk gave the bread. Next time I’m changing up the filling ingredients a bit…pepperoni & mushrooms maybe, then dip in a pizza sausage.

    Can’t wait for the next bakealong!!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Not to fear, Gina, the weights are there too, they’re just hiding! As with most of our other recipes, there are buttons for “volume”, “ounces” and “grams” just under “Ingredients”, so you can toggle between the three. Mollie@KAF

  66. Sylvia

    I made the bread and it turned our beautifully. I may, however, have baked it a bit too long – what should the internal temperature be when this bread is fully baked?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’ve definitely overbaked this recipe TOO before – ending up with a final product that was too dark and/or too dry. Since this a tender, soft loaf, you’ll want to bake to between 190°-200. Hope this helps for bake #2! Mollie@KAF

  67. Alison

    I really like the look of this bread. Was wondering whether it is possible to retard it at some point so I could make the dough one day and bake the next? What would be the best stage to put it in the fridge for an overnight prove? Or would this detract from the texture/flavour? We have been loving the No Knead Crusty Bread which I have been baking in my very old Le Creuset (Dutch Ovens are an unfamiliar concept to UK bakers), and although he is a real fan of this bread, my DH is keen for me to give Pane Bianco a go!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Alison, you could absolutely put it in the fridge (covered with plastic wrap) overnight for the second rise, then take it out and bake it the next morning, or whenever works for you. I also personally tried freezing the unbaked loaf, and it worked beautifully. So after shaping but before the second rise, place it in the freezer on a pan. Once it’s completely frozen, take it out, wrap it well in plastic, then stick it back in the freezer until you’re reading to bake it. Then let it thaw overnight in the fridge, or for about 8 hours, doesn’t need to be at night. Then bake it! Works very well and no impact on the flavor or texture.
      Bryanna@KAF

  68. biscuitbear

    Wow. Such a great recipe! And it makes incredible pizza bread the next day by slicing it, placing the slices on a rack over a cookie sheet, and adding all the toppings you can think of! :0) I can’t wait until next month’s recipe!! Oh.. I’m not an instagrammer … but I noticed that a lot of people were putting their photos on Twitter under the hashtag #bakealong, so that’s what I did too.

    Reply
  69. MarySC

    Oh my goodness!! Great recipe. I roasted my own tomatoes using a recipe from finecooking.com. I added a generous quantity of chopped turkey pepperoni to make it a “meal”, which worked well since turkey pepperoni is very dry. I also cut the garlic back to 1 clove and any more would have been overwhelming (the tomaoes are highly seasoned).
    It is not only tasty but beautiful, and the soft dough was very easy to handle. I sprayed my counter with cooking spray and there was no sticking. I also did not need to tent it while baking- I baked it about 32 minutes so it was not as brown but was done (internal temp 195°). I used the gram measurements and did not have to make any adjustments using KA all purpose flour.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Congrats, Joe! Feel free to share on instagram, twitter or our facebook page with #bakealong. We’d love to see it! Mollie@KAF

  70. robert strack

    The photos show a glorious outer crust which is infused with what appear to be cheese strands and basil. Lovely, indeed, yet neither the recipe nor tips tell of anything being done that will result in this……hum, what gives with this? How was this done?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Robert, that beautiful crust is just how the bread bakes once it’s been sliced down the middle and folded into that shape. The cheese and herbs are just the filling spreading out, it’s not actually the dough infused with anything. Give it a try and you’ll see what I mean!
      Bryanna@KAF

  71. Tena

    Such a great recipe! I used tomatoes and garlic from my garden for the roasted tomatoes. It turned out so tasty. I need to not let the bread rise as long the next time. Today was such a hot day, it rose very quickly. I am looking forward to the next recipe. Thanks!

    Reply
  72. Lorrie Hopper

    The bread turned out wonderful, great flavors. I don’t have #bakealong ability so, I wanted to share that it was good. Thank you

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Lorrie, we’re thrilled you found a way to share your baking success with us, and we hope you participate in the challenge next month as well.
      Bryanna@KAF

  73. Diane Lewis

    I am eager to try this but I am on vacation at 3500 feet. Can you advise me of adjustments for this recipe.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Diane, we have a lovely page dedicated to helping those bakers who live at high altitudes. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/1mzNN58
      Please reach out to us again if you have any questions about the tips and tricks on that page.
      Bryanna@KAF

    2. Maggie

      Diane, you shouldn’t have to make any significant changes to this recipe at 3500 ft. The main thing you may find is your dough rises a bit quicker, but even that may not be very noticeable. Go by the visual clues for the rises given in the blog and your bread should turn out beautifully. I live at 4500 ft and rarely have a problem with yeast bread unless I accidentally over proof. Happy baking!

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Judy, pinching it closed and then flipping it over again to cut it on the other side gives the baker much more control when it comes to the shape. If we were to leave the seam open and then shape it, it would simply open up completely and all of those glorious insides would come out.
      Bryanna@KAF

  74. Mary

    Made this bread this afternoon and just finished eating my second slice. It turned out beautifully and is so full of flavor. Going back to the kitchen for another sample!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Jenie, if it’s very humid out, cut back on the water a bit. You can always add more to the dough, but you can’t take it away. Also, it may rise at a faster speed, so keep an eye on it so it does over-rise, causing the gluten to stretch and weaken.
      Bryanna@KAF

  75. Linda Tschappat

    This sounds like so much fun, definitely in for the challenge. Not big pizza eaters in our house (I know, right?!?) but I could give it away to a friend, she gets almost all my bread every week anyway. I’m also going to make a dessert bread. Now, just to decide what flavor. Hm…peaches are plentiful at the moment. Going to have to come up with a new recipe. Exciting!

    Reply
  76. EL

    I made this with sourdough. I filled it with some roasted tomato sauce I had frozen and some peppers and cheese. It was so good that there are no pictures. It got eaten immediately!!! Oh well. . .

    @ Theresa: You can dry smaller tomatoes using a dehydrator. I use cherry tomatoes or a small plum tomato such as Principe Borghese (which is a classic for drying). You can also sun dry if you live in a drier area such as the Intermountain West. Supposedly you can also dry in the oven on low heat, but you will also cook your tomatoes as well.

    Reply
  77. Kathi

    I made, along with my guy Drew, the Pane Bianco this weekend as part of the challenge.
    I had already made the no kneed whole wheat dough so I sued that, it was delicious and unbelievably easy.
    I made one slight error…we didn’t cut the dough from end to end…instead made section cuts so the exposed interior didn’t occur.
    I plan to make again in the next couple of weeks for a barbecue so I will be sure to try the dough that comes with the recipe as well as execute the construction better.
    Looking forward to next months bake challenge. Kathi & Drew

    Reply
  78. Marsha

    My daughter and grandson invited me to come over and join in the August Challenge and of course I did! Who wouldn’t want to bake bread with your family? It was a hot August day but we were really psyched to do this and the results were fantastic.

    We kneaded our bread by hand not machine and I love the process of kneading; it was new to the grandson and the results were awesome. Everyone enjoyed the product and I enjoyed spending the morning doing this with the them. I posted several photos on IG @quilterinmotion so anyone who’s interested can check them out. Can’t wait for September’s challenge!

    Reply
  79. Wanda

    I love Pane Bianco bread. It takes some time getting it to the table but well worth it! I use my bread machine and that really helped. I’m ready for next challenge. This recipe is a keeper.

    Reply
  80. Heather

    Great recipe! I just took my loaf from the oven….smells amazing! Easy to mix dough by hand and it handled great too. Thanks for inspiring me to bake bread in the summer👍, even in this hot, humid weather!

    Reply
  81. Edd Tury

    Just tried this, following the recipe exactly, but the dough was too wet to handle!
    Managed to get it baked and it tasted good. Not sure what went wrong. Any ideas?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sometimes when baking yeast bread in the summer months when it’s hot and humid outside, you need to add a bit of additional flour. Also, if you used another brand of flour, that may have been the culprit. Other brands tend to be a bit lower in protein content than King Arthur Flour, which means more of it is needed to achieve the same results. Try using King Arthur Bread Flour for best results or hold about 1/4 of water and add it only if seems necessary. The dough should be just slightly tacky to the touch. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  82. Eileen d

    My breads are in the oven. Decided to make two. Made some changes. Did an autolyse first, then mixed dough that I added some oatmeal to and put in fridge for about 8 hours to ferment. Better anyway since we had almost 100 degree weather. I added some pepperoni and salami, plus kalamatta olives to the toppings and our little local grocery didn’t have fresh basil, so added some dried and also fresh Italian parsley. Sure looks beautiful and smells wonderful. Have taken a few pictures that I will send via email as I don’t have Instagram.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We look forward to seeing your photos! You can also post them to our Facebook page if you use that platform. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  83. Cecelia McKnight

    I made the Pane Bianco bread yesterday. I knew my hubby wouldn’t like the tomatoes and herbs, so just put in cheeses. It tasted awesome. BUT….as my father-in-law used to say, I could cook for the blind. My baked goods tasted really good, but never looked like the photos of what they were supposed to look like. Mine was much, much larger than your photos.

    Reply
  84. Dee

    my loaf is baking right now and it looks and smells amazing! I would like to share photos of the process and finished loaf. You mentioned #bakealong, but where? Instagram? Facebook? Somewhere else?
    Please advise.
    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Check out the homepage for bakealong – the featured image is a finished Pane Bianco loaf. It will inspire you to get baking! Once you have your loaf finished, we hope you’ll share photos with us by posting them on Instagram and adding #bakealong, or posting them to the visitor posts section of our Facebook page. Thanks for joining us in bakealong! Kye@KAF

  85. Julie

    The top of yours seems to be shiny, did you do something to it? Ours looks just as beautiful, just less shiny!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Might just be the lighting in the photo, Julie but you’re welcome to brush the shaped loaf with a bit of an egg wash to give it some extra shine if you like! Kye@KAF

  86. Sandy

    I made the bread this weekend. It was a hit! When I patted the dough, it was hard to get it an even thickness, and at two points (near either end), the dough got so thin that it made a hole in the dough, right through to the countertop. How can I avoid this without too much patching? Also, we would all have liked having more of the filling as some slices of bread didn’t have much or just a little pocket here and there.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Sandy,
      We’re glad to hear you gave this recipe a try. To get the bread an even thickness, you’ll need patience and perhaps a rolling pin. You’re right in thinking that you don’t want to totally flatten the dough, as some of those air bubbles are what makes the dough so light and enjoyable. However, a rolling pin can help achieve an even thickness throughout the dough–just have a light hand when rolling. Patience is also key; every time the dough starts to snap back, take a 5 minute break and pause. This will let the gluten relax, and further shaping will be much easier.

      As for your question about the filling, you’re welcome to add more if you feel like you can keep it contained during the shaping process. You’ll want to avoid the dough opening up and exposing the insides too much as the filling ingredients are more likely to burn. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  87. joyce B

    Baked this over the weekend for dinner at my sister’s and it was amazing, both visually and in taste! I thought we’d have it for dinner, but everyone wanted to eat it ASAP, so it ended up being an appetizer! I took photos during the assembly, as well as the finished bread, so I’ll post soon. Thanks so much for the wonderful recipe!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You know it’s a good sign when people can’t keep their hands off your bread until diner! Glad to hear it was such a hit. Kye@KAF

  88. Cloud Swift

    I used the weight by grams version of the recipe. The result was delicious and pretty, but visually it has a lot more tomato than your pictures. I wonder if there was an error in the conversion from volume to weight for them or perhaps a difference in the conversion for the sun dried tomatoes I used vs roasted tomatoes.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re glad to hear your Pane Bianco was a delicious success! We’re wondering if perhaps you used sun-dried tomatoes that did not come packed in oil. This weight of the tomatoes in the filling (4 ounces or 113 grams) accounts for fact that the oil-packed tomatoes absorb some of the liquid and tend to be a bit heavier. Sometimes with agricultural products (where weight can vary), it’s actually best to use volume. I know it seems counter intuitive, but for this one ingredient you might want to pull out your measuring cups. Otherwise, the scale is a great option! Kye@KAF

  89. Tri-Oldman

    I made the Panne Bianco today and all I can say is it was great. My wife love it and ate it as soon as she came home from the fitness center not waitng for our snack time. This will be a “regular” here. I can’t wait for the next challenge.

    Reply
  90. Lynn Rose

    I substituted the filling ingredients for a New Orleans Style Muffaletta! I added the quintessential ingredients..salami, provolone cheese, & of course, the olive salad…I also divided the dough in 1/2 to make (2) smaller loaves. It came out terrific! Thank you… 🙂

    Reply
    1. sandy

      I just made this loaf using the suggestions from Lynn Rose for the muffaletta ingredients. It was really nice and tasty. I cut the salami into into small pieces and sliced the olives and then added cubed provolone. Nice variation. I made the full size loaf…how impressive.

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for asking, Dee — we definitely want you to be able to pin or share this! On a desktop or laptop, a toolbar with the various social media icons should pop up on the left of your screen, and each photo also has the suggestion to “Pin it!”. On a mobile device, you can click on the ^ at the bottom of your screen to follow or share through social media. Hope this helps. Mollie@KAF

  91. Rachel Jones

    Made this yesterday and while it was ok, the bread was rather dense and the outside dry. I am leaning towards user error because i don’t work with bread flour much.
    My dough wasn’t as sticky or wet as in yours was in the pics. My dough was a little stiff (I added some extra water because it was REALLY stiff).
    im guessing i needed more water?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      It sounds possible from what you’re describing, Rachel. No matter which flour you’re working with, dough consistency can be greatly affected by the way you measure your flour — if you choose to do it by volume, we recommend the fluff and sprinkle method explained here: http://bit.ly/1Q2PToo — and the ambient temp and humidity — the cooler and drier the environment, the more liquid you typically need. It’s also possible that the loaf was just a little overbaked – remember that you’re aiming for just barely golden with this tender loaf, as opposed to the darker golden brown you look for with an artisan bread. If we can help troubleshoot any further, please feel encouraged to give our Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE. Our bakers are here seven days a week and happy to help! Mollie@KAF

  92. Beverly

    Wow, what a combination of flavor and beauty too. I added some chopped fennel seed to the tomatoes to add an extra pizzaish flavor. I think I am going to try the same technique with cinnamon roll loaf. Had some trouble getting the dough on my pan but got it in the end.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Parchment paper can be a wonderful tool to help transport dough in the kitchen. It’s a staple in our test kitchen and we can’t recommend it more highly! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You sure can, Stephani. Just replace the 1/2 cup of milk with an additional 1/2 cup of water and add 2 tablespoons of Baker’s Special Dry Milk in with the other dry ingredients in the dough. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  93. drgns4vr

    I baked this and took it to Book Bunch. They loved it. I took marinara sauce, but most just ate it straight. They were all impressed by how “fancy” it looked. I was impressed by how easy it was to put together.
    I didn’t have the dried tomatoes in oil, but just used plain dried ones. They worked very well.

    Reply
  94. Lydia

    Looking forward to baking this bread and to the bakealongs that will follow. Just wondering, have you all considered perhaps posting a video guide on your youtube channel to accompany your blog post for these bakealong challenges? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for the suggestion, Lydia. We’ll be sure to consider this feedback in future discussions about bakealong recipes, but for the time being the step-by-step walk through in our blog is what we offer. If you have a question about something that’s not covered in the blog, you can always give our expert bakers on the hotline a call; they’re happy to help! 855-371-BAKE(2253). Kye@KAF

  95. Faye

    Hi, just wondering about using KAF artisan bread flour in the recipe as its what I have on hand. Would I need to adjust the water amount?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Faye, you can reduce the water to 1/4 cup as it has the same protein percentage as all-purpose flour. Be prepared to add additional flour or water as needed to make a smooth, slightly tacky dough. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  96. Sarah

    This was really fun and something I had been too scared to try before. I was wondering if there is a way to incorporate my sourdough starter for some extra flavor?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sarah,
      You can add some sourdough starter to the dough by adding in 1 cup (8 ounces) of either fed or unfed starter and then reducing the flour by about 1 cup (4 ounces) and the water by 1/2 cup (4 ounces). Adjust the consistency of the dough with additional flour or water as needed. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  97. Daniel De Kok

    Loved the ease of making the pane bianco. Mine didn’t look as pretty as the one in the picture but it was delicious. I used finely shredded mozzarella for my cheese (what I had available) and frankly it got lost in translation. I would recommend to others to use the sharpest shreddable cheese (Cheddar or Romano spring to mind) you have available to stand up to the other flavors.

    Reply
  98. Nancy Mock

    My Pane Bianco is about to go in the oven! This has been a great recipe to try, and a nice use of tomato and basil from the garden. I did go with all-purpose flour and less water, but had to add a little water back in as the dough seemed too stiff. Past that point though the dough seemed to be fine.
    I cannot wait to taste this bread, and to see what other challenges are on deck!

    Reply
  99. Terri Wolfe

    This was a hit at work. I used feta for the cheese and it was a good blend of flavors. I didn’t have oil packed sundried so used regular sundried and they got a bit overly brown. I think the oil packed would have addresses this issue. Fun project…like the apple bread version, I think.

    Reply
  100. Kalistrya

    This smelled absolutely delicious while shaping it. 5 minutes to go in the oven…

    I went with the filling in the recipe but imagine cheddar with chorizo, garlic, and cilantro would be a good modification.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We agree, Kalistrya! We can’t wait to try all of the tasty modifications other bakers have suggested and made. Mollie@KAF

  101. Barbara C

    I’m very excited to give this a whirl but really need to use a no-knead bread because of time restraints before lunch which is our main meal of the day. Should I use an olive oil dough as for pizza or go with challah that is enriched using butter instead of oil to minimize the spread of the dough? I’m using recipes from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. Any other suggestions are very welcomed! I roasted my tomatoes and they are ready to go!! Thank you!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for your eagerness, Barbara. You can really use these filling and shaping techniques with any dough you like. We’re not familiar with the AB5 versions of these recipes, but we suspect that either would work beautifully. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Feel free to use any basic dough recipe you like, Joy. If that’s sourdough, go ahead and prepare the dough as you normally would but fill and shape the loaf as described here. Our Basic Sourdough Bread recipe would work well for this. The sour flavor will be quite a lovely surprise next to the Italian flavors. Yum! Kye@KAF

  102. Jaymie

    I finally had time to give this a try today. Turned out delicious!!! Looks like a complicated bread, but came together in no time. Can’t wait to share with friends and family! Thanks for offering the bake-a-long!! Can’t wait to see what the next challenge is!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re glad to hear you’re eager to participate in Bakealong! To share your photos, you can post them to Instagram and add “#bakealong” to the caption, or you can post them to our Facebook wall. If you don’t have either an Instagram or Facebook account, we encourage you to consider signing up so you can join our community of bakers talking about bakealong! Both accounts are free. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  103. Jane, Tulsa, OK

    Mine didn’t brown enough in the time mentioned, and didn’t cook enough in the time mentioned. When toasted, it tasted okay. I think I will cook it on the convection setting this next time since I ate it so quickly anyway ( I gave half to my daughter to try).

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re glad to hear you like the flavor of the Pane Bianco, regardless of the color of the crust. It sounds like your oven might be running a bit low, so we think it’s a great idea to experiment with the convection setting. You can also skip the tenting with tin foil step if you’d like your crust to brown up a bit more. If you have a kitchen thermometer handy, you can use it to test for doneness. Look for at least 190°F when it’s finished baking all the way through. Good luck! Kye@KAF

  104. Patti D

    I didn’t get a chance to try this until Labor Day weekend, stretching August a little. I love how the recipe turned out. It has great eye appeal and smells so good! I can wait to taste it. I stuck to the recipe as I wanted to see if I could even make this. I will try some of the variations described.
    Thank you, King Arthur for challenging me!

    Reply
  105. Vincent DeSalvo

    Tried last night for the first time and my wife and I loved the look and taste of this bread. Pane Bianco will be cooked again at this house. Very easy to make, even for a beginner.

    Reply
  106. Sheri

    This bread is beautiful, and it tastes better than it looks. Great recipe and a lovely new shaping technique. I didn’t have time to do it til now, but looking forward to another bake along. It it next week?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for joining us in the challenge, Sheri! September’s bakealong is already posted on our site: http://bit.ly/2c8EtSS. You’ll see us start to promote it later this week, but you should feel free to jump in and bake as soon as you’re ready. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Carol,
      We’re glad to hear you’re eager to participate in this month’s Bakealong challenge! To share your photos, you can post them to Instagram and add “#bakealong” to the caption, or you can post them to our Facebook wall. If you don’t have either an Instagram or Facebook account, we encourage you to consider signing up so you can join our community of bakers talking about Bakealong! Both accounts are free.

      If you would not like to share your photos using these platforms, you can simply send us an email with the photos attached, and we will pass them along to the Bakealong team to view and enjoy. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  107. Eileen Sullivan

    I started this bread about 4 hours ago and am still waiting for the second rise. It took several hours to double in bulk. The dough was definitely not soft enough. In future challenges, could you please post the weights of the flour, not just he quantity? I’m sure I had too much flour in the mixture, though I scooped and leveled the flour carefully.
    I roasted the tomatoes with garlic, so I’m hoping it will turn out well, as long as I can stay up another hour and a half to finish baking it!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      A heavy, dry dough does sound like the likely culprit here, Eileen. We’re sorry you’re having so much trouble with it. The good news is that we do include measurements in weight (both ounces and grams) for most of our recipes, including this one. When you click through to the recipe page itself, you’ll see the option to toggle between volume, ounces and grams just under the “Ingredients” heading. Hopefully this will make things a little easier next time around! Mollie@KAF

  108. Morgan

    I can’t wait to try this recipe. Going to apply some things I learned at a local bread baking class.

    1) shape the lovely loaf on parchment on a pizza peel and bake on my pizza stone.

    2) cover the loaf with a large lightweight stainless steel bowl for the first 15minutes of baking. The overturned bowl traps the steam coming off the loaf and produces a great crust.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re so happy you’re eager to give this a try, Morgan! We love both of the techniques you mention, just keep in mind that this isn’t designed to be an artisan-style, crusty loaf, but more of a tender one. You can certainly still give the overturned bowl technique a try, but it will likely lead to a harder crust, which you may or may not find desirable with this recipe. Either way, happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  109. Janay

    I baked this in my combo microwave / convection oven in our RV. It was my first attempt at bread baking using the convection option. I did follow the ‘cover with foil’ instruction, but it didn’t get as browned as I would like, so will omit next time. Otherwise a success. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Tess, we’d love to see a photo of your beautiful loaf! We’re asking bakers to share photos by using the #Bakealong on Instagram or Twitter or when posting to our Facebook page. If you don’t have an Instagram, Twitter or Facebook account, we encourage you to consider signing up so you can join our community of bakers talking about Bakealong! All three accounts are free.

      You can also feel free to email your photos to us at customercare@kingarthurflour. Pictures shared over email won’t be shared publicly, but we’d be happy to celebrate your success with you! Barb@KAF

  110. Tess

    Thank you! I tried posting to the King Aurthor FB page but wasn’t able to. 🙁 I ended up “tagging” King Aurthor to the post of my pictures. Hope you get it! I’m so proud of myself! Lol. Having for breakfast today! I also added the photos to the comment section of the post where I shared the recipe that can be seen on the King Aurthor page. Thanks so much for getting back to me. Oh! Also added the #Bakealong to the photo listing but not sure if that did anything. Have an amazing day!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Tess, I’m sorry you had difficulties posting to our Facebook page! You should be able to post a picture as a visitor or within a comment to one of our posts. In any case, we’re glad you enjoyed baking this recipe and being involved in the bakealong! Barb@KAF

  111. Patty Rushing

    I made this bread today. It looks just like the picture you posted and tastes fantastic!!!! Love the bake along as it encourages me to step out in to another level of baking! Love KAF!!! Thanks for the challenge!

    Reply
  112. Susan

    I made this fabulous bread. My husband now thinks I’m a baking genius. I didn’t tell him how easy you made it, giving step-by-step instructions. Thanks so much to everyone at King Arthur.

    Reply
  113. Christine Geery

    I made this bread and it was absolutely wonderful. Will be making it again today to go with the homemade vegetable soup I’m serving tonight. Yum!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sounds like you need to befriend a local baker, Nancy! Unfortunately that’s not something we’re set up to be able to do for readers, but we appreciate the thought. Best of luck! Mollie@KAF

  114. Nancy A. Speed

    Hello KAF ~

    I’ve been a bread baker for many a decade, but now I don’t use dairy or eggs. What would KAF recommend using as an alternative to eggs?

    Nothing else will do in my kitchen except for King Arthur Flour!!! KAF is the best!!

    Thanking you in advance.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for your kind words, Nancy! There are a number of options when it comes to egg replacements, but one of our favorites is rehydrated flax meal. A read through this blog post on the topic can help you get started: http://bit.ly/1rjEuYo Mollie@KAF

  115. BETH

    I finally got around to making this yesterday and it was a hit. Just beautiful. Very impressive. My family thought it was so clever to have done it. It was really big, however, and I think next time I will make two smaller ones. Has anyone tried that?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Beth, I often divide this recipe into two smaller Pane Biancos. You can follow all the same instructions and check for doneness a few minutes earlier than you otherwise might (smaller loaves bake faster). Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Feel free to use raw spinach if you like, Ann. You won’t get the lovely herbaceous flavor that comes from using basil, but you’ll still get the vivid green color. Only use a small amount; a few tablespoons will do. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  116. Sarah G

    Is it possible to make this without the egg? I have a friend with an egg white allergy and I would love to make this for her.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sarah, this recipe works just fine with an replacer like rehydrated flax meal. For details about how to make your own at home, take a read through our blog article on the topic: http://bit.ly/1rjEuYo Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  117. Amy

    Do you have any thoughts on how to make this into personal sized rolls, even if they are larger than average rolls? I’m intrigued with the idea of making this, but when I first saw the picture they looked like they might be rolls, not a whole loaf of bread, and that seemed like a really neat idea.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Interesting thought, Amy. We’d suggest simply dividing the dough into more pieces and shaping each individually, but it would be challenging to shape a smaller loaf in exactly the same way. One possibility would be to follow the shaping instructions up through the step of rolling up the dough and then to slice it into pieces 1″-1 1/2″ wide. Then allow them to rise a second time and bake–sort of like a savory cinnamon roll. If you come up with another creative idea, we hope you’ll share it with us! Mollie@KAF

  118. BHLori

    Have a tall 2′ high vase, a round cylinder with about a 5″ opening at the top, the diameter is the same from top to bottom, will clean it, tape blue painter’s tape vertically to the outside, pour cups of water in it, marking where the measurements are in 1/2-1 cup increments; oil it before adding the dough and watch the dough rise.

    Reply
  119. Carson

    I make a sausage bread that has browned, crumbled sausage (sage with some red pepper flake added is how I roll), pepper jack cheese, and parsley. It is usually just a filled loaf, but I love the shaping of this loaf and am thinking of trying it the next time I make sausage bread as it will be that much more impressive. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel , post author

      Carson, we like how you roll – sounds delicious! Great idea using this shaping method for your bread. PJH

  120. Stephani Haskins

    I have made this twice now! Did not last very long, everyone loved it. Going to make it again for Christmas Eve.

    Reply
  121. midwestern swing

    I didn’t have any sun dried tomatoes so I diced 3 Roma tomatoes, tossed them with olive oil, balsamic, dried herbs and pinch of salt, and roasted them on a sheet pan while the dough was rising. The bread looks and tastes incredible. The dough was easy to work with, too.

    Reply
  122. Suzanne

    I would like to make this for my family and a neighbor who just had surgery, but my physical health won’t allow me to make it twice. My mixer doesn’t hold double dough recipes, and we really don’t need large loaves. Any chance this could be made into 2 smaller figure 8’s with the original recipe or perhaps 1 1/2 times the dough recipe? My mixer can probably handle that. Obviously if this is even possible, I also need any tips on other changes i.e. different measurements. Would a narrower roll twist into an S easier??? Would baking time need to be adjusted?

    I’ve made this shape sweet multiple times but trying savory is exciting. Though my 1st bake will be as written, my brain is filling up with ingredients to use in the future. I’m not able to bake as much as I’d like so I just discovered this “bake along” and I’m very excited.

    Thanks very much for your time, Suzanne

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Suzanne, you can certainly divide all of the ingredients in the recipe in half if you’d like to make a smaller loaf. Pat the dough out into a rectangle that’s roughly 15″ by 6,” or until the dough is about 1/2″ thick. (Alternately, you can use the whole recipe and divide it into two smaller loaves.) Shape as pictured here and bake at 350°F for about 35-40 minutes. You may need to tent with foil after 25 minutes if the crust appears brown. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  123. Ashish

    Hi. Looks really interesting. Want to try this recipe. Can I substitute egg with some other ingredient , like butter milk. Pls advise.
    Thanks

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Ashish, if you’d like to replace the eggs in this recipe, we recommend using Golden Flax Meal blended with water. For full instructions on how to make this swap successfully, check out this article on our blog. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    2. Ashish

      Thank you so much for ur help. U ve an amazing website. Will soon try this recipe without egg. Thanks once again.

  124. Kelly

    A few commenters noted they halved in order to make only one loaf. From my review, it looks as if the full recipe is intended for a single loaf, yes?

    Appreciate the clarification. I will be attempting this week as my first loaf of bread. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Kelly, there was an older version of the recipe that made two loaves, but it has since been updated so that it now make one (generous) loaf. Even with the recipe as it is now with 3 cups of flour, some bakers like to make two mini Pane Biancos by diving the dough in half. Feel free to use either approach, knowing that shaping is certainly easier when you use the full batch of dough. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Cindy, these loaves freeze very well once baked and cooled, but freezing them unbaked is more of a risk, as there’s so much of the loaf and filling exposed (the more exposure, the more yeast die-off and the more of a risk of freezer burn). If you decide to give it a try, we’d suggest freezing just as soon as your loaf is fully assembled, before the second rise. Freeze it flat until it’s frozen solid, then wrap it up nice and airtight. When you’re preparing to bake, move the frozen loaf back to a cookie sheet (unwrapped, but tented with plastic), and allow it to thaw for 8-12 hours in the fridge. Move it to the counter just long enough for it to complete the second rise, then go ahead and bake as the recipe directs. Mollie@KAF

  125. Penny

    I made this and looks wonderful. When I sliced it most of the toppings are on top and not distributed through the bread. Did this happen in the rolling up the roll or in the cutting? I may not had enough basil not sure how to measure fresh basil. Thank you for the great recipes.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Penny, it sounds like the toppings may have been pushed to the edge of the dough during the rolling stage of shaping. To avoid this, try to pick up the rolled part of the dough slightly and place it down on top of the toppings before pushing it forward. This should help keep some of the toppings in the center part of the roll. Also, feel free to adjust the amount of basil that’s used to meet your taste preferences. Try roughly chopping the basil and packing it lightly into a 1/3 measuring cup, but feel free to add more if the dough seems bare. You can also experiment with using pesto! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Gigi, yes you sure can take that approach. It’s an easy way to bring the dough together, especially if you have a dough blade. Knead by hand until the dough is soft, smooth, and slightly springy to the touch. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  126. Lani S.

    I made this last night with tomatoes and basil from our garden. It is DELICIOUS!!! Thank you so much for this recipe!! My new favorite to bring to events or to eat all by myself…

    Reply

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