How to bake for good: sharing the love (and the loaf)

Bake for good isn’t just an empty phrase here at King Arthur Flour. It’s something we do constantly, baking and sharing with one another, our local food pantry, and our fellow citizens at regular meals for the hungry. And we’ll be stepping up our efforts next month, since October is Bake for Good Month.

Baking outreach is also something we do nationwide. In fact, we’ve taught over 300,000 kids how to bake bread — and how to share with those less fortunate, as well.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

We bring our Bake for Good: Kids program to middle-school children at over 200 schools around the country each year. We show the kids how to make our simple Everyday Whole-Grain Bread, then give them everything they need to go home and bake two loaves themselves.

Next day, the kids return to school with one of the two loaves, wrapped up and ready to deliver to a local food pantry. Not only do these impressionable 11- and 12-year-olds learn to bake bread — they see what a difference they can make for needy people in their own community.

#BakeforGood Month is easy: Pick a recipe. Bake with love. Share with someone important to you. Click To Tweet

Baking and sharing is your chance to make a difference in someone’s life — one loaf, one cookie, one muffin at a time.

The instructions below are what we share with our middle-schoolers. If you have a child at home, we encourage you to include him or her in the process, walking yourselves through the steps in this post. Or watching our Bake for Good: Kids video.

But if you’re a seasoned baker and simply want to put the dough together your own way (mixer, bread machine, etc.), feel free. It’s the end result that counts, and that end result is very satisfactory indeed.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Start with top-quality whole wheat flour. Kids love our white whole wheat, with its mild flavor and light color; it’s my favorite whole wheat flour as well.

Yeast is just as important as flour, so choose the best. The kids in our program use Red Star Platinum, a vigorous instant yeast that Red Star generously provides free of charge for our classes. Check your supermarket’s baking aisle or dairy case to find packets of this strong and reliable yeast.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

First, get the yeast going

In a large bowl combine 2 cups lukewarm water, 1/4 cup sugar, 2 1/4 teaspoons (1/4-ounce packet) instant or active dry yeast, and 2 cups (8 ounces) King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Let the mixture rest for a few minutes, until some larger bubbles start to form.

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Gradually and carefully mix everything together

Add another cup (4 ounces) white whole wheat flour, 1 tablespoon salt, and 1/4 cup vegetable oil.

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Stir to combine.

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Add 2 cups (8 1/2 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Stir to combine. Notice how the dough is starting to thicken.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Sprinkle an additional 1/2 cup all-purpose flour over the sticky dough …

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

mixing it in with a spatula or your hands.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Sprinkle 1/2 cup all-purpose flour onto a clean work surface. I’m using a silicone rolling mat here.

Gather the rough dough into a ball, and transfer it to the work surface.

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Knead the dough until smooth

Knead the dough for 5 minutes, adding a bit more flour if needed to prevent sticking. The dough should become fairly smooth and elastic.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Let the dough rest for a few minutes while you scrape out your mixing bowl; a bowl scraper works well here. Wipe or spray the bowl with vegetable oil.

If you’re kneading by hand, knead the dough a few minutes more; it should feel bouncy. Need some visual cues? Check out our video, how to tell if bread dough is fully kneaded.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Place the dough into the oiled bowl…

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

… and cover it with plastic wrap. Or an elastic shower cap, as I’ve done here. Let’s hear it for shower caps, rising dough’s best friend!

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Let the dough rise

Place the dough somewhere warm (65°F to 75°F is ideal) to rise until very puffy, about 1 1/2 hours. It should just about double in size.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Deflate and shape

Gently deflate the dough. The easiest way to do this is simply to grab it, pull it out of the bowl, and gently squeeze it in on itself. Doing this is a great demonstration of gluten, the protein in flour that, combined with liquid, becomes stretchy bread dough.

Divide the dough in half. Shape each piece into an 8″ to 9″ log. Want tips on shaping the perfect sandwich loaf? Watch our video.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Place each log into a lightly greased 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ loaf pan, or onto a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Tent the loaves with lightly greased plastic wrap.

Hey, there’s that shower cap again. I’ve “poofed” it over the loaf in the pan, then draped plastic wrap from the shower cap over the loaf on the baking sheet, using the cap to make a little tent. This helps prevent the wrap from sticking to the dough as it rises.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Let the loaves rise

Thirty minutes should do it. They’ll become quite puffy.

While the loaves are rising, preheat your oven to 375°F.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Bake the bread

Uncover the bread, and bake it for about 30 minutes, until the crust is golden brown. If you have a digital thermometer, the internal temperature at the center will be about 190°F. Remove the loaves from the oven.

When they’re cool enough to handle safely, transfer them to a rack to cool.

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

Celebrate Bake for Good Month with fresh homemade bread!

Be sure to let the bread cool completely before you slice it. I know it’s hard, but slicing hot bread can make the entire loaf gummy. Patience is a virtue!

Bake for Good Month via @kingarthurflour

I slashed the top of this freeform loaf, a step we don’t ask our middle-schoolers to take. Slash your loaf, or not; it’s not necessary, but can make a pretty pattern.

Bread and butter are a great pair — just like baking and sharing.

It’s not critical whom you choose to share with; just that you do. Whether your specialty is butter pecan cookies, brownies, or blueberry muffins, bake a batch, put some in a bag or box, and take them where they’ll be most appreciated.

We hope all of you out there regularly take the time to put your baking heart and soul into at least one baked treat that you make and share — with your family, friends, work colleagues, the parents at the football game, the folks at the fire station…

Want to Bake for Good? October is Bake for Good Month; join us by taking the pledge here.

What will you bake, and whom do you plan to bake for? Please share in comments, below.

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!

comments

  1. N.M.

    How do you arrange with a food pantry to accept the donated bread? I would love to cook for a food pantry and provide, say, casseroles frozen in mini-loaf pans, or bread as seen here, but none of my local pantries feel comfortable accepting homemade food.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      N.M., we commend your efforts to bake for good! All Feeding America affiliated food pantries or food shelves, and many others, will accept baked goods from a home kitchen as long as the ingredients are provided. The Good Samaritan Act gives citizens and the organization the protection to do this. Try entering your zip code into the Find Your Local Food Bank page on Feeding America’s website to get an idea of where to start your search. We recommend calling the organization you’re hoping to donate to in advance to ensure they’re able to accept your generous donation. With a little perseverance, we’re sure you’ll be able to find a great match. Good luck and happy baking! Kye@KAF

    2. AngieD

      Check with your local warming/homeless shelter or women’s shelter. In my area, there are quite a few organizations that would be glad to accept your donated meals, etc! 🙂 thank you for being so generous with your baking skills!

    3. Jane

      We have found a number of older people in town who live in retirement homes. To stretch their food budgets they take the one meal they’re provided each day and eat half at noon and half at night. It’s really probably not enough calories for them, and we watch them wither. So we bake and bring them surprises several times a month. We have people all over the city and we call or text to let them know that the Bakery Bus will be delivering X to their door that afternoon. They are eager for company and the extra treats we bring. That way we get around some of the laws that the local food banks have about home baking.

    4. Deby Hogue

      I love this idea, but I am in Costa Rica and no King Aurthur Flour. I can still go to the local school and make Bread and have the kids give one loaf away to local families. So cool. Thanks Deby I am cookinginthejungle.com

  2. Clare Poirier

    I bake 3times. A week I share with my neighbors church and family. King Arthur flower has been a staple in my home and my mothers for over 70 years

    Reply
    1. Carolyn R. Martens

      Certainly wish I had learned to do this many years ago!!!!! I’ve cooked and shared with folk for years, especially older neighbors etc. but not always older, but I never baked much. My mother-in-law baked a lot so I made such a mess the first time I tried, I decided to leave that for her. That is, except for homemade refrigerator rolls (out of the only cook book I had at that time—a wonderful Betty Crocker one that I got before I got married !!! ) Had to quit those when the scales started going up and up but still LOVE homemade rolls and can make my whole meal with them——don’t need anything else !!!!!

  3. Nancy Mock

    When my son was in fifth grade the Bake For Good: Kids program came to his school, and he loved it! We had a great time baking bread together. I hope you are able to share this presentation in a lot of schools, it’s such a fantastic way to inspire kids to give back to their community.

    Reply
  4. Margaret

    Recently moved to Denver. I have made many loaves of whole wheat bread in Minnesota and Virginia and have been happy with the results, but here, my loaves have not risen much and they are heavy. What are your recommendations for baking bread at high altitudes?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      In general, we recommend reducing the yeast slightly because dough typically rises too fast at high-altitudes. However, it sounds like something else may be the source of your trouble if the dough isn’t rising enough. Try holding back on the flour slightly and adding a bit more water so that the dough is slightly tacky to the touch. Also check your yeast to ensure it’s fresh. Lastly, check our http://www.kingarthurflour.com/learn/high-altitude-baking.html for advice on tweaking the baking time and temperature for bread, as well as a number of other treats you might like to bake. I hope that helps! Kye@KAF

    2. Kali

      Your dough may be drying out too much while it proofs, especially if you are using something like a towel to shelter it. Does it feel a hint dry or almost leathery on the surface when it fails to rise? You can add a bit of steam by sticking a cup of hot water next to the dough inside whatever you are using to cover it, which will keep the surface moist and elastic and let it rise. Alternately, you can get your hand wet and just stroke over the surface of the dough.

  5. Venita Johnson

    I’m a beginner baker and for health reasons; I need to make my food from scratch. I am making my bread by hand.

    Could you please explain why a stand mixer vs by hand is better when making bread? I am wondering is a Kitchen Aid stand mixer is worth getting. Costco has one online.
    Thank you for your support!

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid

      Stand mixers are wonderful things, and can significantly increase the range and number of baked goods anyone can make, but they’re not at all necessary in order to make bread. In fact, if you’re new to baking bread, there’s a lot to be said for learning to do so by hand first. You’ll be able to feel and interact with the dough more, and as you do you’ll get a greater understanding of how the dough changes as you mix and knead it. Then, once you literally have a “feel” for the process, if you want the convenience of a mixer later on, you’ll get the most out it. Susan

    2. Christopher Smith

      I am fairly new and do everything by hand. I find it relaxing. That being said, if Santa brings me the KitchenAid I asked for, I will be very happy.

  6. Julie Denhart

    Why do you change to all purpose flour halfway through this bread preparation? Using White Whole Wheat Flour is new for me. Two members of our family deal with hypoglycemia. I look for recipes that use whole wheat flour with no sugar or corn syrup. I have tried a sugar substitute or add applesauce. It has been a trial and error thing. I would appreciate any suggestions that you might offer.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Julie, this recipe uses half white whole wheat flour and half all-purpose flour so that it rises nicely and isn’t overly whole wheaty in flavor or texture. If you know your family loves whole wheat baked goods, feel free to use all whole wheat (either white or regular) and omit the all-purpose flour. You may find you need a bit more liquid, as whole grains are more absorbent than all-purpose.

      You can reduce and eliminate the sugar if you like, but the loaf won’t brown as much and it won’t keep for quite as long (sugar acts as a preservative). The flavor will also be a bit more mild, but you can safely adjust the sugar to your liking. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  7. Joann Reese-Harris

    The joy of baking has been a true love for me since high school when I was a member of FHA. I was blessed to be invited to go with our local Home Demonstration Agent to Home Demonstration Clubs to demonstrate the art of baking to farm ladies.
    Some of them, old enough to be my grandmothers, always enjoyed the new recipes we gave out. Of course, the bread and cinnamon rolls were always part of the refreshments. Teaching kids to love baking is a wonderful idea. Can’t wait to try the recipe for bread which I’ll share with my grandchildren.

    Reply
    1. Hazel Zamperini

      what an interesting statement for this decade “Home Demonstration Agent to Home Demonstration Clubs to demonstrate the art of baking to farm ladies” Is this charity or sales oriented ?

  8. Helen J Coletti

    Just wondering why the measurements don’t add up, on 1 pic it says 2 cups (8 oz) another says 1 cup (4 oz). What are correct amts?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Helen, we’re happy to help clarify. The total amount of whole wheat flour that should be added to the dough is 3 cups. Initially, you should mix 2 cups (8 ounces) in with the water, sugar, and yeast. Then after a brief resting period, add another 1 cup (4 ounces) along with the salt and vegetable oil. You can also click here to view the full recipe. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    2. Midge Cahill

      I too was confused by this, Helen, as 2 cups = 16 ozs. not 8 ozs. I think this must be what 2 cups weighs on a scale.

    3. The Baker's Hotline

      You’re right, Midge! Whenever we reference ounces in our recipes, we’re talking about weight, not fluid ounces. While one cup of water = 8 fluid ounces = ~8 ounces in weight, other ingredients weigh out very differently (1 cup of flour weighs 4.25 ounces, for example). Mollie@KAF

  9. fanya395

    Why not bake on the facility? Don’t most of these pantries have kitchen equipment? Maybe you could teach baking courses on premises? Give a man a fish….

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Great thought! While some food pantries and community kitchens may allow volunteers to come to the premise and bake and cook (and perhaps even teach), other places don’t have this resource available to offer. However, if you check with a food pantry that partners with Feeding America, they should be able to accept food donations that are baked elsewhere. Just give them a call beforehand to ensure they’ll be ready to accept your donation with open arms! Kye@KAF

  10. Ciaz

    Ciaz, hi, I bake plain white loaves and I use a sourdough starter, but, without much success so far, as the loaf goes flat and hard. Any recommendations on preventing this from happening?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Ciaz, it sounds like you might need to enliven your sourdough starter a bit by feeding it more regularly, or perhaps adding a bit of commercial yeast to the dough to ensure a pleasant rise. If your loaves are falling flat, you may need to add more flour (be sure you’re using a flour with a high protein content like King Arthur All-Purpose or Bread Flour). Try stretching and folding the dough over onto itself a few time before the final shaping of the loaf. You could consider baking it in a bread baking bowl or loaf pan for additional support.

      To keep the dough soft and tender, consider adding a few tablespoons of vegetable oil in place of some of the liquid in the recipe. This should give you a loaf that is closer to what you’re looking for. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

  11. Cathy

    Am a member of a group that once a month bake and package cookies for a homeless feeding facility. In November and December we bake small loaves of sweet treats. All who participate, whether monthly or a few times a year, appreciate the opportunity to share the love!

    Reply
  12. Susan Ivancic

    At St. John’s Episcopal Church in Ross, Ca. we bake our own communion bread each week from a list of bakers who have volunteered on a list that is emailed every three months. We presently are using non GMO flour grown up at Bishop’s Ranch in Healdsburg but if I run out of that then my cupboard is always stocked with King Arthur’s flour.
    For an average Sunday we need 8 round loaves but for holidays throughout the year it goes up to 15.

    Reply
  13. Anita Rutledge

    I share my homemade sourdough bread with neighbors, family, and Church Members, for funerals, holidays, or just because I feel like it. It is also a great comfort to those who are recovering from illness or a hospital stay. It brings me great joy, to share this with others!.

    Reply
  14. Donna

    We bake for our bake sale at church with proceeds going to our school weekend end food and our food pantry and homeless shelter.

    Reply
  15. Beth Guido

    I just made a call and we will be baking cookies and taking them to the Senior Center to serve with there lunch. I really enjoy sharing my baked goods. I believe I smile bigger than the people eating them..

    Reply
  16. Andy Bailey

    Love this program! Will you ever offer bakers – who are interested in conducting this program at local middle schools – the opportunity to be “certified” to conduct this class?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for asking, Andy. Currently there’s no certification process in place to be able to teach these classes, but instead we have a self-directed Bake for Good Program for those who are eager to bring this program to their community. All that’s required is a simple application, and we provide the other resources you’ll need, including the planning guide and recipe booklet right on our website. Check it out and let us know if you have any other questions! Kye@KAF

  17. Christine

    Being a older person starting to learn how to bake bread from scratch, could you please tell me at what temp, degrees should bread be? It seems like I always under bake my bread and they come out a little doughy. Thanks to all of you. Great receipes.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Christine, congratulations for taking up the ancient craft of bread baking. We’re never, ever too old to learn, are we? If you mean baking temperature for bread, I usually use 350°F for sandwich loaves or rolls; 425°F for crusty breads like baguettes. If you mean internal temperature of the finished loaf, that ranges from about 190°F for sandwich or other soft loaves or rolls, to about 205°F for crusty beads and some denser whole-grain loaves. Hope this helps – bake on! PJH

  18. Jan

    Two of my coworkers and I are doing the King Arthur Flour BakeAlong each month and sharing the results with our office friends! Everyone loves it 🙂

    Reply
  19. Nancy Rogers

    I am the owner of a Tutoring Center and have students from 1st-12th grades, some with special needs. This week all of my students have worked with a partner to make a loaf of bread to take home to share with their parents. They had to read the recipe correctly, gather the ingredients and measure their ingredients. Then the pan was placed in the bread machine to make the dough and bake the bread. The purpose of this exercise with the students was to learn to read the fractions, measure the ingredients correctly and follow the recipe completely, with no changes. The bread was cut into 2 sections and each member of the team took their bread home the next day. The breads that were made were Basic White Sandwich Bread, Sourdough Bread, Steakhouse Black Bread and Foccocia. Only the Foccocia was baked in the oven. The students loved it and really cooperated with each other. Great job, kids!!!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      What a great project, Nancy! We love the way baking can combine very practical lessons in science and math with less tangible ones in patience, creativity, and teamwork. Thanks for all you’re doing to share those lessons with your students! Mollie@KAF

  20. Karen Huntley

    Thank you for the email to join your program for October: Pledge, Bake, Share. I pledged to share. I started October 1st and have baked and shared 5 loaves of bread so far. I have been using different recipes; Old Fashioned Oat bread, white bread, and wheat bread. My husband always made our bread, I failed at breadmaking. In 2013 I bought a Zojirushi Bread Maker and sometimes I make 2 or 3 loaves a day. I still can’t knead bread and make a loaf the standard way, but I feel accomplished now that I too can make delicious breads. Thanks for the challenge.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Karen, thank YOU for jumping head first into this challenge! We’re thrilled that you’ve found a way to make delicious bread of your own and bet your friends and neighbors are too. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  21. Kelli Bryan

    This may be a silly question but here goes: any recommendations on making smaller, mini loaves? Would the little paper loaf pans work or even inexpensive ceramic mini loaf pans? Would I need to reduce oven temp/cooking time? Thank you!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Kelli, not a silly question at all! You sure can bake mini whole-grain loaves if you like (perhaps for mini toast or tea sandwiches?). Our medium paper pans could work for this, or our you could use our Mini Loaf Pan (which is metal rather than ceramic). The medium loaves will take about 25-30 minutes to bake while the mini loaves will take 18-20 at 350°F. It’s always best to test for doneness using a kitchen thermometer if you have one; the center should be at least 190°F when they’ve finished baking. Kye@KAF

  22. John Clement

    We are lucky to have commercial equipment in our Church so we started baking for the local food pantry 3 years ago. In our state (TN) if we are giving it away the license is easy to get and not very expensive. We bought the bags and ties on line at webstrauant.com. We have 3 helpers and manage to make 120 loaves each time we bake. We usually do it Sunday schedule permitting and are almost at 10,000 loaves since we started. It is an easy way to help people at a low cost. If anyone needs advice send me a message.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re sorry to hear you’re having trouble submitting the pledge form, Rita. Try using this link here. If you’re still unsuccessfully, please five our friendly Customer Support Team a call at 800-827-6836 so we can get you signed up and your coupon on its way. Kye@KAF

  23. Betty Childs

    My question for the second time, is when using my scales do I weigh the container that my flour is in or is this automatically figured for me??

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Betty, you have to weigh just your ingredients, not the mixing howl, canister, or anything else. Your scale should have a “tare” feature that sets it to zero. Put your bowl on the scale, “tare” it (set it back to zero), then weigh out your ingredients. Does this help? PJH

  24. Karen Jempson

    Ok, I know I’ve seen this addressed before but can’t find it. 1 cup flour (4 ounces). Totally confused because “1 cup” is 8 ounces. Help!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Karen, you’re not alone in being confused. The sticking point lies in the difference between metric ounces and fluid ounces. While one cup is 8 fluid ounces, one cup can weigh very different amounts, depending on what’s in that cup. One cup of flour measured with our method will weigh 4.25 ounces, while one cup of water will weigh about 8 ounces. When we use the term “ounces” on our site (and generally in baking), we’re always talking about weight, not fluid ounces. Hope this helps to clarify! Mollie@KAF

  25. david brothers

    I have been baking bread for years, I will only use King Arthur, don’t know why but its the best. I do all my breads by hand. my mother taught me to let the dough rest between kneading, it makes all the difference. cant wait for it to cool so I can have a slice buttered and peanut buttered. a glass of milk. yum yum

    Reply
  26. Karen Riegle

    Arthritis nixes hand-kneading for me – have KitchenAid w/dough hook and also the Zo bread machine. Any advice about time/speed for dough hook and/ or adapting recipe to bread machine? Especially when in cycle to remove from machine and shape for pan rise to prevent holes, which bother many people, apparently.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Karen, you can use your KitchenAid mixer to knead most types of bread dough. Use the dough hook and mix on the lowest speed for 3 minutes to incorporate all the ingredients, and then on speed 2 for 3-4 minutes to knead the dough. This works for most bread recipes, although some breads (like brioche) require a longer kneading time. Set your bread machine on the dough cycle and remove the dough and shape it when this cycle is finished. If you’re finding the bread has too many holes when baked after the dough cycle, it may be because the dough comes out of the bread machine very warm and rises very rapidly. You could try reducing the amount of yeast you use in the bread machine. Another option is to deflate the dough after it comes out of the dough cycle and put it covered in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes to an hour before deflating it again and shaping it. This should help slow down the final rise in the pan and give you a more compact crumb. Be sure not to use “rapid rise” yeast, as we’ve found this particular variety of instant yeast does not do well in recipes calling for a more extended rising time. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      If you’d like to make this bread with our unbleached all-purpose flour it should work fine, but you may want to hold back on about a tablespoon or two of the water, since the AP flour won’t absorb quite as much liquid as the white whole wheat flour does. Add the reserved water as necessary to achieve a soft, smooth dough. Barb@KAF

  27. Merle

    I brought four meals and a large pan of soup to someone this week, will try to do that every week,. He lives alone, doesn’t cook, doesn’t drive, and has beginning alzheimer disease.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Merle, thank you so much for making the effort to bake for someone I’m sure appreciates it. You’re proving that simple actions, done with kindness, can make a huge difference in someone’s life. 🙂 PJH

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Pat, it’s important not to confuse fluid ounces and ounces by weight. 1 cup of water (and similar liquids) weigh 8 ounces, but 1 cup of flour is much lighter than these ingredients. (Think about comparing the weight of 1 cup of rocks and 1 cup of feathers; they won’t weight the same amount when placed on a scale.) In this case when we’re using ounces to measure by weight, 1 cup of flour weighs 4 ounces. I hope that helps clear up any confusion. Kye@KAF

  28. Linda Sharrow

    I have been baking for a number of years, yes 11 to be exact. We never buy any baked goods, I make them. My bread baking got started after I retired. I have some techniques that I learned from a Cookbook author, they work and I have used them ever since. I even taught a baking class after we first moved from So. Cal. to Northern Michigan. When gas prices rose to $4.00 a gallon I had to give up teaching the baking class as the kitchen store was one hour away from our home. Sad day.
    I have been using King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour now for about 2 years. Very Good product!!!

    Reply
  29. Lois Detrick

    Every Sunday our church serves breakfast to 40-80 homeless, depending on how many show up, in one of the local parks. My part is to bake quick bread. (Always looking for more recipes). Somehow that bread always disappears!

    Reply
  30. Melissa S.

    I love to bake, and I bake for good every week for my church and Bible study groups. I bake scones, breads, coffee cakes, morning buns, cinnamon rolls, and other breakfast treats to share almost every week we meet. It gives me the chance to bake and exercise my pastry chef skills and give others a tasty treat. It feeds my soul and theirs.

    Reply
  31. William Lundy

    I help out with a local food programme that supplies meals to needy people, without any cost, at the end of every month when people’s personal finances have run low if not out : EOTM (End-of-the-month Meals). I baked two dozen of Peter Reinhart’s “Unkneaded Six-Fold Baguettes”, some whole wheat, some multigrain, and some “regular”; these were served with the dinners we provided.

    Reply
  32. Janet L Thayer

    The conversion chart that came with my Salter scale states that a cup of unsifted flour weighs 5 ounces and sifted flour weighs 4 ounces. Should I be using sifted flour?

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Janet, there’s no need to sift the flour. Our recipe was written pegging all-purpose flour at 4 1/4 ounces per cup, and whole wheat at 4 ounces per cup; so use 12 3/4 ounces all-purpose flour and 12 ounces whole wheat, and you’ll be good to go. PJH

  33. Liz Davey

    Your local police and fire departments will appreciate some home baked goodies. So will the folks at the public works or highway department. expecially during or after a spell of really bad weather. I bake cookies for a Saturday soup kitchen that my church serves every other month, biscuits for the church’s monthly breakfast, make meals for friends who are ill which usually includes a pie, and my husband and I cook breakfast at our Sr. Center once a month.

    Reply
  34. Vernon Hale

    I can’t believe that I am hearing the same type questions over and over. Every very good cook knows that there are two types of basic measuring appliances. One for liquid (usually Pyrex type) and one for dry (metal with graduating sizes), although I prefer using a scale. When measuring dry ingredients, use the metal, fill the appropriate size you want and scrape any excess off level and you have the correct measurement. Liquid can be measured up to the appropriate line on a Pyrex type measuring cup. I hope this helps clarify some of the mysteries of measuring ingredients, weather for cakes, pies, cookies or breads. Baking is more of an exact science and not the same as for cooking as in soups, stews, roasts and such where you can adjust by tasting. Just putting my two cents worth in. Hope this helps someone.

    Reply
  35. Debbie

    Each spring I bake and donate approximately 250 cupcakes for our local Single Parent Scholarship fundraising luncheon. Not only does it give me the opportunity of honing my cupcake skills, I receive so much pleasure from sharing with this wonderful organization.

    In addition, during the holidays, I bake over 100 loaves of my husband’s favorite pumpkin bread which he distributes to our local fire, police and sheriff’s departments. He makes rounds throughout our community handing out loaves and good wishes–so much so that people start asking him in early fall when they should expect their loaves. He says it’s the best Christmas present he has ever given and gotten!

    Reply
  36. jean diemer

    My husband thinks I’m crazy when he goes to the store to buy my flour and I insist on King Arthur Flour and tell him if they don’t have the kind I want, then don’t buy me anything else. Have used it forever and it never fails. Perfect every time. Just wish the above recipe was also listed as printer friendly so I can print w/o all of the pictures. Thanks so much and I will be baking for others in October

    Reply
  37. MJ Domen

    I made a variety of cookies – maple spritz (leaf shape), Orange flavored pumpkin shaped spritz, chocolate chip cookies, snickerdoodles and chocolate crinkles. I took trays to Dad’s assisted living home and my mother-in-law’s nursing home. All cookies disappeared quickly! I take cookies to Dad every time I visit. (He’s six hours away.) Periodically, I make enough to share with staff and residents.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Thanks so much. I’m very familiar with assisted living and nursing homes, and I’m sure the residents and staff are incredibly appreciative. PJH

  38. Debbie

    Hi, I am a baker and have been thinking about a project like baking for good for a while. I give away much of what I bake every year and would like to do some “good” As a new breast cancer survivor, I am looking for an outlet for my baked goods that would support other women who may not be as fortunate as I have been or who just need something to brighten their day. I have not figured out exactly how to make it happen yet, but I will, and in the meantime, I will contact my local food bank. Thanks for the great idea and the ongoing communication.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Debbie, best of luck to you from a fellow survivor! I’ve found that often hospitals have hostel-type living accommodations for family members from far away whose loved ones are being treated, and who need to be around long-term. I’ll bet those families would really appreciate some home-baked goodies to brighten their day. Check it out — and thank you. PJH

    2. Janice

      Debbie, I too am a breast cancer survivor. When I was going through chemo eight years ago at this time of year I would bring baked treats with me on treatment day. Baking became a therapy for me. And the other patients and staff loved it. Maybe I’ll check with the cancer center to see if I can bring some goodies up there.

  39. Nancy Johnson

    My daughter Danae and I already baked a coffee cake for a family at church after their 5-year-old son broke his arm, and we took it to them in the evening after dinner (since I work during the day.) I live in China and teach at an international school, so the family was dealing with the Chinese hospital. They have three older daughters as well. So, I am kind of pledging after the fact. I still hope God will provide more opportunities to minister to those who are sick or in need.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Thank you, Nancy and Danae — I’m sure the cake was delicious, and very much appreciated. PJH

  40. Karen

    After buying my long-awaited KA 7qt. mixer ,your SAF yeast (Red& Gold) ,learning to not have to proof yeast , and kneading with the dough hook NOW you’re saying to proof an instant yeast (Unknown brand to me ) and knead by hand . I am new to yeast dough , still not a pro by any means a nd I am feeling overwhelmed right now ! What have I missed ? PJ , I need at least a cheerleader or a shoulder to cry on ! I can’t even give a sincere LOL ! HELP!! Thanks ! You guys can all have a laugh at my expense . I just don’t want to hear it here in TX !

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Oh, Karen, so sorry! We didn’t mean to totally confuse you. Imagine me offering my shoulder from afar… Please check out our blog post showing how to make this bread using your stand mixer. No need to use the platinum yeast, either – SAF Red is fine. Just dump everything in the bowl of your mixer, mix with the beater for a minute to bring it together, then knead with the dough hook until nice and smooth. You can do this! (That’s me being your cheerleader…) 🙂 PJH

  41. Heidi Knudsen

    I used an old recipe for whole wheat bread from my now-deceased mother to create a couple loaves, one of which I donated to a local pay-what-you-can mission cafe. I used King Arthur whole wheat flour in the dough and am happy to report that it did not disappoint! KA flours are superior to most others which I have used.

    Reply
  42. Ron Regehr

    I have “regular’ bread baking down pretty well. I’m wondering if you or your readers have tried using mesquite meal as a supplement to your recipes. It is fantastic in pancakes and cornbread.
    The reason I ask is because mesquite is a sweet, nutty flour that natives used for millennia. The beans are quite common, and I wish for a very reliable recipe to share with them. Mesquite, although sweet, has a very low glycemic index and diabetes is rampant on the reservation.

    Thank you!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for the suggestion, Ron! We’re happy to pass this along to our Recipe Development Team for their consideration. In the meantime, we hope you’ll keep us posted about your results if you experiment with it yourself. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  43. Jodi

    Using KA white whole wheat flour, I made a blueberry bread from my Grandmothers hand written cook book. I delivered it to a new neighbor who has two children and is fighting stage 3 breast cancer. Today I am making Savory Pumpkin bread for another neighbor who just moved in. Fresh warm bread is a great way to say “Welcome to the neighborhood!” I do have a question though. Going forward, can I use almond milk or coconut milk in your bread recipes instead of dairy milk? I cannot have dairy. Baking is more of a chemical reaction type of cooking, so I would like to know ahead of time, where as savory cooking has been a breeze to adjust recipes to non dairy. Thank you so much for your support and your encouragement to share with friends and neighbors and anyone in need! Bake For Good is a great idea!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for all you’re doing to spread the joy of home-baked goodness, Jodi! In answer to your question, yes, you can substitute non-dairy milks like almond or soy or rice milk for the dairy milk called for in our bread recipes. Coconut milk probably wouldn’t work in quite the same way, but you’re certainly welcome to give it a try. Happy baking! Mollie@KAF

  44. Dianne Shaw

    Since they no longer teach cooking or baking in schools anymore, I started teaching my step granddaughters to bake. They are thoroughly enjoying this and I get a great deal of pleasure in this also. They knew how to cook from their mother but, she never learned to bake either. We need to teach our children or this will become a lost art. I love baking and always have. I taught both of my boys how to bake when they were growing up and it has served them well.

    Reply
  45. Karen

    So glad you said this recipe could be kneaded in the KA .But , I also have RA and would like to mix it in the mixer . Do I start with the paddle to really get the rise etc . going or is the hook alone sufficient ? Been waiting awhile to make this and it’s finally getting cool enough here in TX to bake again ! Thanks for all the great recipes !

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Karen, yes, start with the paddle, until everything is thoroughly combined and has come together. Then switch to the dough hook to knead. Glad you folks are cooling off down there — we’ve got snow up this way tonight! 🙂 PJH

  46. David

    Well, my bake for good was a little late, like most everything else I do. I got some freshly baked bread to our local Ronald McDonald house today.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      It’s never too late to Bake for Good, David! Thanks for joining us and for sharing some much needed home baked love. Mollie@KAF

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