How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour

You bought a bag of self-rising flour to make biscuits.

And you made biscuits, and they were superior: moist, tender, high-rising, and REALLY easy.

But you still have most of a bag of self-rising flour left – now what?

Well, there’s no need to use that self-rising flour ONLY in recipes calling for it. By using the following guidelines, you can easily substitute self-rising for all-purpose flour in many of your favorite recipes.

1. To substitute self-rising for all-purpose flour, look for recipes that use baking powder: about ½ teaspoon per cup of flour, minimum.

Our self-rising flour includes both a concentrated form of baking powder, and salt. Self-rising flour will work just fine in recipes using about 1/2 teaspoon (and up to 1 teaspoon*) baking powder per cup of flour.

*What about recipes using more than 1 teaspoon baking powder per cup of flour? Add enough baking powder on your own to make up the difference.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

2. When making the substitution, omit the baking powder and salt from the recipe – it’s already in your self-rising flour.

Let’s see how these tips translate to real life – starting with a worthy candidate, our 2015 Recipe of the Year: Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies.

Besides including leavening and salt, self-rising flour also differs from all-purpose in its protein level. All-purpose flour’s protein is 11.7%; self-rising checks in at 8.5%.

That’s quite a difference. How will that translate to cookies? I have my suspicions; let’s see how they play out.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

OK, we’ve got our all-purpose flour dough balls on the left, self-rising on the right. The recipe calls for 1 teaspoon baking powder and 2 cups of all-purpose flour – which meets the criteria of 1/2 teaspoon baking powder per cup of flour.

The dough looks the same for both versions. Let’s put these beauties to the test: into the oven they go.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

Ah, as I suspected: the self-rising flour cookies (right), with their lower protein, start to spread more quickly than those made with all-purpose flour.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

And that quicker spread yields slightly larger, flatter cookies.

What’s up with that? Lower protein means less gluten, which translates to less/looser structure: more oven spread.

Not a deal breaker, though. I wouldn’t throw those self-rising cookies away – would you?

If you have a cookie recipe that spreads a lot using all-purpose flour, then it’s probably not the best idea to substitute self-rising flour. But any cookie with normal spread – one using at least 1/2 teaspoon baking powder per cup of flour – should be just fine.

Chocolate chip oatmeal cookies: check.

Let’s try another popular recipe, Banana Bread. The recipe calls for 1 teaspoon baking powder and 2 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour.

Uh-oh – that’s not “at least 1/2 teaspoon baking powder per cup of flour.” But rules are made to be tested, and it’s close; let’s see what happens.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

The batter made with self-rising flour is just slightly thinner. Again, that’s a reflection of self-rising’s lower protein level.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

Still, both breads rise and bake up similarly.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

Maybe the self-rising flour bread is a tiny bit flatter across the top? But without a side-by-side comparison, you’d never know.

Banana bread: check.

Finally, let’s try one of my favorite cake recipes, Lazy Daisy Cake.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

This is the first recipe I ever baked on my own. As a 14-year-old holding down my first Saturday job, I felt EXTREMELY grown up when my boss, noticing me admiring a slice of cake she’d brought for lunch, hand-printed this recipe on a 3″ x 5″ card (remember those?) and gave it to me.

I felt even more grown up when I got out my mom’s electric beater, her favorite bowl, found all the ingredients, and baked a perfectly wonderful cake. In fact, I think it might be this cake that first hooked me on baking.

Let’s see how it does with self-rising flour. It’s an old-fashioned hot milk cake, calling for 1 teaspoon baking powder and 1 cup of flour: that’s 1 teaspoon baking powder per cup of flour, double the minimum.

Will the self-rising flour have enough leavening power?

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

Absolutely. That’s all-purpose flour on the left, self-rising on the right. They look exactly the same.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

Once cut, it appears the all-purpose flour cake may have risen a bit more evenly; but that also might be just a simple aberration. Both have a lovely crumb.

How to substitute self-rising flour for all-purpose flour via @kingarthurflour

And both versions, with their broiled brown sugar/coconut topping, taste just as I remember from junior-high days: superb.

Hot milk cake: check.

Now, what about recipes that include both baking powder and baking soda? Or only baking soda – no baking powder?

For recipes with both leaveners, include the baking soda just as you would if you were using all-purpose flour.

For recipes using baking soda, but no baking powder – well, you’re on your own. I can tell you that as far as leavening power goes, 1 teaspoon of baking powder is approximately equivalent to 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda. I leave any further recipe math up to you!

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!

comments

  1. Jakess

    LOL!! I just asked one of your bakers about this Friday for a cake I wanted to make on Monday. I used the SR flour and the cake turned out great. She basically said the same thing you just did and I actually found her comments and your post both very helpful and informative. I’ve been using the SR flour primarily for making scones and biscuits and really wanted more reasons to keep buying it. It really does make baking a streamlined and now that I have a firmer grasp on making conversion from AP flour I’ll be using it more often.

    Reply
  2. Liz

    Lazy Daisy cake was my first cake too! I took the classes at the power company in Santa Monica in the early 60s and it was in my Ready Killowatt cookbook. Still my favorite cake. I’ll try it with self-rising flour.

    Reply
  3. Sandy

    Do I remember using 3×5 recipe cards?? I’m still using them! Haha. Some good ideas never go out so style as far as I’m concerned. Just call me old fashioned. Lol!

    Reply
  4. Alice Moriarty

    Why in the world would I substitute Self Rising Flour for plain all purpose flour? I read labels & I have not found any that do not have aluminum in it. Now, I’ll admit I haven’t checked this in several years. Is King Arthur’s self-rising flour with aluminum- free baking powder? If so, I will happily change over inasmuch as self rising flour is surely more convenient. I’m sure there are many cooks like me who would switch to self-rising flour if it were aluminum-free. Meanwhile I’ll continue to check labels & eliminate those products which are detrimental to my health.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hello Alice, our self rising flour is currently being made with aluminum free baking powder. Happy baking! Jon@KAF

  5. Laura

    Call me ignorant, but I don’t see the point of self rising flour. Why not just add the baking powder and salt yourself, and control the amount of each? The protein difference is interesting, but again, why not choose each ingredient on it’s own merits? Am I missing something?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You may certainly do that, Laura. Self rising flour is a southern staple that has existed before traditional mixes, and it has remained popular for pantries in the south and north. It is usually hard to find a flour with such low protein that isn’t bleached, so we enjoy it for quick biscuits and pancakes. Jon@KAF

    2. The Baker's Hotline

      Self-rising flour has baking powder added to it, so if your recipe calls for only baking soda, it’s not a great recipe to use self-rising flour in. If it calls for baking powder AND baking soda, then you can use self-rising flour and omit the baking powder, add the baking soda. If that’s a bit confusing, you can always give our friendly Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE(2253). Kye@KAF

    3. donnymarie

      Because I live 25 miles from town and didn’t have enough traditional flour on hand when the kids wanted a chocolate cake; there was plenty self rising flour in the pantry, usually only used for quick and easy three ingredient buttermilk biscuits.

  6. lisa

    Thanks for this post, PJ. I nearly always sub SR for AP, using the mental math to eliminate whatever salt & BP I should. I appreciate the side-by-side comparison pics, though, as I’ve never done that in my kitchen!

    Reply
  7. Judi

    I’m glad you posted side by side pictures with the different flours – for me, this reinforced my decision to stay with AP flour for my baking. The reduced protein in SR flour DOES make a huge difference in the final texture and appearance of baked goods, enough that I would not compromise in the name of “saving a step or two” with ingredients when selling my baked goods to the public. In fact, I don’t like SR flour AT ALL and avoid recipes that call for it. Now that I know the culprit is the protein difference and not just a question of flour to baking powder ratio, I won’t be trying to substitute SR flour for my tried and true AP flour. As the saying goes, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!!”

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      If you love your all purpose flour, then feel free to stick with the stuff you know and love! Some bakers prefer the results that a low-protein flour gives, namely super tender and delicate baked goods. If you like your baked goods to have a solid structure to it, then all purpose is the choice for you. Happy baking, Judi! Kye@KAF

  8. Rosemarie DeKruyff

    I made the Christmas scones recipe from your website today, with the substitution of the KAF self rising flour since i had some on hand i wanted to use before it expired. It was not a success! I used my scone pan because i didn’t anticipate a problem with that, but the “scones” were very moist – almost like cake – and i couldn’t get even one out of the pan intact. When i peeked in the oven, the scones had overrun their borders and looked like the dough was in a cake pan. Actually, the “cake” tastes delicious. If i had used a square cake pan, pieces could be removed with a spatula and served as cake. But i would like to know what you think went wrong. I haven’t made this recipe with regular flour, so i don’t know how that would behave, but no one has posted such a problem on the comments with the recipe.
    i did add an extra teaspoon of baking powder since the recipe called for 3 tsp. I’m wondering if the one cup of buttermilk called for in the recipe was too much, since the dough was much wetter than any scones i ever made, and I’ve used many of your recipes. Often they give a range of liquid, but this one didn’t. That would be my first guess, but I’d like to know what an expert thinks. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Rosemarie,
      There’s a couple of things at play here. First, the self-rising flour already has baking powder and salt in it, so by adding even more baking powder, that would cause the overrun and difference in texture. The lighter flour would also absorb less liquid than the all purpose flour, making for a wetter batter. Hope this helps. ~ MJ

  9. Rosemarie DeKruyff

    Thank you, Mary Jane. I added the extra baking powder because PJ’s blog (above) indicated that if the recipe called for more than 1 tsp baking powder per cup of flour, one should add enough to make up the difference. The christmas scone recipe specified 1 Tablespoon b.p. for 2 cups of flour, so i added 1 additional tsp b.p. The overrun itself wouldn’t have been a problem, since when i removed them from the oven i used a spatula to very gently define the edges of the scones along the pan guidelines. The difficulty in getting them out of the pan was they were very moist and didn’t stay together. Kind of like a moist carrot cake. (and yummy) definitely worth trying again.

    Many thanks for your suggestions. Next time i will cut back on the liquid and I won’t add the extra baking powder. I noticed a post under that recipe that someone added an egg white to “help the scones hold together”. (That recipe does not call for an egg). what do you think of that idea?

    Reply
  10. Deb

    I had the overrun problem as well with a tried and true banana bread recipe. The recipe calls for both soda and powder. Following this sites advice I didn’t add powder, but did add the soda. What a mess!! Should the soda still be used if using SR flour??

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Deb, if a recipe calls for one or the other, or both, make sure to use it for best results. Bryanna@KAF

  11. Teresa

    Your a life saver!!! Your post saved a bag of flour from getting dumped. I accidentally bought it weeks ago apparently not paying attention. My head must of been in a fog that day.

    Reply
  12. Karin

    I have the opposite question. I want to try making a Victoria Sponge Cake. Every recipe I’ve found calls for self-rising flour but I don’t keep that as I don’t make any other recipes that call for it. What do I need to add to AP flour to replace SR?

    Reply
  13. Michele Benton

    Greetings from Australia! I googled your site to find out what “all purpose” flour is – here we call it plain flour. For cakes we use self raising flour, it’s so easy. I’ve never seen baking powder here so I had to research that too. We must have it I’ve just not used it- have to add bicarbonate of soda etc- to complicated! Thanks for your sage advice!

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Hello from “top over”, Michele! (I figure if Australia is Down Under, Vermont must be Top Over!) Yes, plain flour – though I believe the protein in our all-purpose flour is generally higher than that of plain flour, at least the plain flour in Great Britain. We use self-rising flour, too; as you say, it’s REALLY easy. My favorite recipe using SR flour is these two-ingredient Never-Fail Biscuits – YUM! PJH

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sue, adding 1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon salt to each cup of AP flour to convert it to self-rising flour will not reduce the protein contend. I would recommend adding an additional tablespoon of water per each cup of AP flour substituted, to adjust for its higher absorption rate. You could also try using pastry flour (with added baking powder and salt) as a substitute for self-rising flour. Barb@KAF

  14. Artist Elaine

    This post is very helpful-for those who can actually find self-rising flour to buy (I understand it’s the norm in parts of the south). However, for those of us in the north with almost no availability (and definitely NO KA self-rising flour), please explain the reverse. What does a baker do when the recipe calls for self-rising and there is none in sight? I have seen various “recipes” for this, but I would like to see it from the experts in making and using flour-King Arthur! Thank you!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Elaine, to make your own self-rising flour, add 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon salt to each cup of all-purpose or pastry flour substituted. If you’re using all-purpose flour, the protein content will be greater than the self-rising flour, so you may need to add an additional tablespoon of water per each cup of AP flour substituted. Barb@KAF

    2. Artist Elaine

      Thank you so much, Barb@KAF, for your most helpful answer! As I said, I have seen instructions for making your own self-rising flour, but none of them ever mentioned the water adjustment possibly being necessary! That’s why you go to the experts for your answers!!! 🙂

  15. Jim Fields

    3X5 cards … back in the early 90s I went with a friend to West Va to visit his family and to buy Blenko Glass . Milton West Va . while there his Mom baked a free goodies for us . He has for the recipes and she wrote them on a 3×5 card front and back . now speed ahead to 2007 I had sold my home and was moving in with friends due to health reasons .. while packing I opened one of my cookbooks and there was the card how I got it now sure . his Mom has since passed in the late 90s and he now lives in Fla .. for his birthday I had it framed in with glass on each side . ..

    Reply
  16. Cara Worland

    I have always substituted self rising flour for all purpose flour in every recipe I make. There is never any problem, and I have never even considered not doing it. Everything I make turns out great, cookies, cakes, pies, I could go on and on.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’ll be sure to pass your baking love on to PJ herself. And we will admit, she really is lovely! Keep up the good work, Mylena. Baking successes are made possible by experimenting in the kitchen. Kye@KAF

  17. sheri

    I use self raising flour for pancakes which are the best as well as other baked items. I have a question though i made a pound cake using all purpose flour and you could have drove over it with your car it was bad so i was told to use cake flour and it came out great. What if i sifted the self raising flour would that make a nice soft pound cake?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sheri, yes, I think you could follow the directions in this post to substitute self-rising flour into your pound cake recipe and it should work quite well, although depending on the type of cake flour you have used in the past, the protein content of our self-rising flour may be a bit lower at 8.5%. In this case you may find the batter wetter than you’re used to, because the higher the protein content, the more liquid the flour will absorb. The lower protein self-rising flour will not provide as much structure for your cake either, which could cause it to be more fragile. Our cake flour has a protein content of 10.8%, so quite a bit higher than our self-rising flour. Barb@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Your baked goods won’t rise as intended since there will be no baking powder in the recipe. It also likely won’t taste as delicious since you’ll be missing the salt. Best to stick with self-rising or use the proper adjustments if substituting all-purpose: add 1 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder plus 1/2 teaspoon of salt per cup of flour in the recipe. Kye@KAF

  18. nick

    i need a good cake recipe.. i have 3 jumbo eggs and self rising flour and the rest of the ingredients.. please help..no milk though. 1- 9 inch pan

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Nick, I would check out our recipe for Self-Rising Crumb Coffee Cake. It has no milk, self-rising flour and three eggs. Bryanna@KAF

  19. Tamara

    Need help. My daughter just made my chocolate chip recipe with self rising flour and they don’t taste the same. It’s not sweet at all. We haven’t baked them yet. Is there anyway to fix this batter?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Tamara, if possible, you might want to try to modify your recipe according to this Self-Rising Flour Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe–adding ingredients or doubling the recipe in order to get the proper amount of ingredients. The biggest problem is that the self-rising cookie recipe does not have added baking powder and salt (because the self-rising flour contains these ingredients already), so if you double the recipe, use all-purpose flour for the remaining flour and don’t add additional leavening or salt. Barb@KAF

  20. Susa

    I make pound cakes all the time. The recipe I use calls for cake flour. Made a new recipe that called for all purpose flour, no salt or baking powder or soda. Cake was packy. Could I use self rising next time????

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Susa, if you use self-rising flour instead of all-purpose in a recipe that doesn’t call for salt or leavener, it will change the texture quite a bit (and also have a slightly salty taste). It will rise some while it’s in the oven and might be a bit lighter. You also may like the texture of our Golden Vanilla Pound Cake recipe–it uses our all-purpose flour, but it also has a bit of baking powder added to it to give it a slight lift. Happy baking! Kye@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’d love to help, Allybug, but we’re not quite sure what you’re looking for. Is there a specific recipe you’re looking to make? Are you looking to bake gluten-free? Grain-free? If you give us a little more info, we’ll see what we can come up with! Mollie!KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      What a treat, Vonda! There are many delicious things you can make with this gift. We don’t have a printed packet, but we’ve printed out three of our favorite recipes and sent them off to you. Perhaps you can print more at a local library? Here’s a link to the online treasure trove: http://bit.ly/2aKomIu (please note that for your security we’ve removed your address from your comment) Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks so much for checking, Joseph. It looks to us like you have an old version of our product sheet (from 2007). The info you’re seeing here and on the product page on our website listing the protein content at 8.5% is the current and correct info. Here’s a link to a more updated version of the document that you might find helpful: http://bit.ly/1LqpP43 Mollie@KAF

  21. Connie

    Hi, I am making a Kentucky butter Bundt cake, it calls for AP flour, all I have is self rising flour, Do I omit the 1 teaspoon of BP , & the 1 half teaspoon of soda?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Connie, our Self-Rising Flour can be used in recipes that call for at least 1/2-1 tsp of baking powder per cup of flour. Assuming your recipe calls for no more than 2 cups of flour (and therefore no less than 1/2tsp baking powder per cup), then you can omit the baking powder (and salt) and add the baking soda in its original amount. If the recipe calls for less than 1/2 tsp baking powder per cup of flour, then this won’t be a good candidate for substitution as you’ll end up with excess baking powder. This can get confusing, so please also feel encouraged to give our Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE to talk it through. Otherwise, happy baking! Mollie@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      The very basic answer is that it depends on what you’re making, Charmaine. For some products (think breads, bagels, pizza dough, and some kind of cookies) more protein = more gluten = more structure is considered a good thing; while for others (think cake, pastries, biscuits, some scones and muffins), the goal is tenderness, not structure, so lower protein is better. Self-rising flour is designed for use in those more tender products (most commonly biscuits or pancakes), which is why we mill it to a lower protein content and why it isn’t always a great sub for more structured products. Hope this helps! Mollie@KAF

  22. Tinu Aj

    I find this very useful because of your detailed explanations and especially the baking experiments that further distinguishes both flours. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  23. Sharon

    Wow this was super useful! I would have never guessed that the self-rising flour has salt in it, in addition to the baking powder. Thanks for the info!

    Reply
  24. Carolyn

    I have a recipe for Cream Cheese Pound Cake. It calls for 3 cups all-purpose flour but all I have is self-rising. There is no baking powder or baking soda called for in the recipe. Will the self-rising flour work? I can’t get to the store right now.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Carolyn, I wouldn’t recommend using the self-rising flour for a recipe that does not call for baking powder, and because the protein content of self-rising flour is quite a bit lower than all-purpose flour, it may not provide enough strength for your pound cake recipe. Barb@KAF

  25. Beverly Clark

    I am trying to make Grannies recipe for fruit cake she is 95 and doesn’t remember if she used self rising or plain flour, but it says to add 1 3/4 cups of flour and 1/2 t of soda. She thought the soda was because we were adding nuts?? but she thought she used self rising. I am trying to make them for her for Thanksgiving any suggestions?

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      I’d go ahead and use self-rising flour and the baking soda. Just 1/2 teaspoon isn’t going to make the cake rise so much that it’s no longer fruitcake texture, I don’t believe. And she may have a better memory than she thinks – so go with what she says. 🙂 PJH

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      You could give it a try, Sande, but given that cornmeal doesn’t contribute any structure-building protein itself, the low-protein content of the Self-Rising Flour may not be the most desirable counterpart. We suspect you’d end up with a more crumbly final product that might have a hard time holding together. Mollie@KAF

  26. Barbara

    I just read all the comments above and have learned a lot!! Thank you for all your information regarding AP and SR flours. I just made a carrot cake and used 1 cup of all purpose and 1 cup or self rising flour in my recipe. Will I notice a difference? Will using both types of flours change the texture of the 2 layer cake?

    Thank you! Barb

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Depending on what kind of flour the carrot cake recipe was designed to use, it may be a little loftier or slightly more flat than what was intended. We recommend using the kind of flour that’s called for in the recipe, or making the proper substitution as shown here. Using just the right amount of leavener is the key to make a perfectly tender cake. We hope your carrot cake turns out well! Kye@KAF

  27. Sandie Ruggieri

    I have a receipt that calls for 4 cups flour but no baking powder, but 1 tsp. salt. It does call for 1 tsp. baking soda. Can I still use self rising flour is stead of all purpose?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sandie, we recommend substituting Self-Rising Flour into recipes only if there is at least 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder per cup of all-purpose flour. Since your recipe uses baking soda instead, that probably means there is an acidic ingredient that it’s meant to react with. This recipe probably isn’t a great contestant for making the swap, but we might be able to help you tweak it in other ways to make it work if you give our Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE(2253). Kye@KAF

  28. Vicki

    I have a question. I want to make baguette. I only have self rising flour and the recipe I have calls for all purpose flour. Help please

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Vicki, Self-Rising Flour isn’t a great flour to use in yeast bread recipes (which includes baguettes). Yeast is the desired ingredient to make baguettes rise, and Self-Rising Flour contains baking powder (a chemical leavener). We recommend holding out on the baguette making until you can get your hands on some all-purpose flour. You’ll be more pleased with the results. Kye@KAF

  29. Grace Mccall

    Hiya, thanks for the explanation! A further question – what then happens if I’ve accidentally substituted SR for AP flour in a bread recipe that has no baking powder or soda? (Just flour, water, salt and yeast) Will it kill the yeast and result in a denser loaf? Just trying to understand the mechanics..

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid

      Grace, using self rising flour in a lean yeast bread recipe won’t “kill” the yeast, but it will give you a much different texture than you’re expecting. The loaf won’t be as tall (not nearly as much protein for structure), the crumb is going to be much finer, like a cake(that’s the action of the baking powder), the flavor is going to be saltier, since there’s extra salt in the formula, and the dough won’t knead as you expect – likely to be stickier, or drier, depending on if you’re kneading by machine or by hand. By hand you should notice the difference in the dough’s texture immediately; it will not get as elastic as you’re expecting and it will be hard not to add more flour. Susan

  30. Susan

    I have a banana bread recipe at calls 2 cups all purpose flour and 1 tsp baking soda. I only have self rising flour. Can you please tell me what to do.. thank

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Sadly, this isn’t a cake where you’ll want to use Self-Rising Flour. You can use this flour if your recipe calls for at least 1/2 teaspoon per cup of baking powder. Since your recipe doesn’t call for any baking powder at all, it won’t produce great results if you swap the flour. If you’re looking for ways to use your Self-Rising Flour, check out the full selection of tasty options here. We hope you find something that works well for you! Kye@KAF

  31. Suzie

    I have a recipe for a soup that calls for all purpose flour and salt but does not call for baking soda or powder. Would it be safe to use the self rising flour?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      We’re envisioning a bubbling, slightly metallic-tasting soup, Suzie. (The baking powder may cause these reactions.) For best results, you’ll want to use all-purpose flour to thicken your soup effectively. Enjoy! Kye@KAF

  32. Gabe

    So I’m making a yeast-free cinnamon swirl loaf, and it calls for 2 cups all purpose flour, 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1 cup buttermilk. I don’t have all purpose flour, so I was wondering if I should not use the salt and baking soda, but the baking soda uses the buttermilk to activate. If I don’t use the buttermilk, will it affect the viscosity and everything of the batter!?!? Please respond!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Gabe, it sounds like there’s lots of adjustments going on in this recipe, and we want to understand what your goal is and what ingredients you have as options. Please give our friendly Baker’s Hotline a call at 855-371-BAKE(2253) so we can talk through this together. Kye@KAF

  33. Amoret Hinkley

    A quick response to the questions of why use self-rising instead of all purpose is the lower protein content. As a loyal North Dakotan I use Dakota Maid all purpose flour from our state mill, and it is high protein, more equivalent to a bread flour.than to most all purpose flour.

    That high protein means that it works really well in yeast breads, and in any cookie where you want a chewy or firm texture, but it’s really hard to work with for quick breads, biscuits (and scones) and cakes where you want a tender or crumbly texture. After years of using cake or pastry flour, or biscuit mix for some things, with varying results, I’m now experimenting with self-rising flour and it works so much better in coffee cakes, muffins, and biscuits/scones. I do need to use less (usually about 3/4 the amount called for in my local church cookbooks) liquid, and in some cases more baking powder, but I can finally make tender crumb cakes and muffins.

    The only real disaster has been my favorite banana bread recipe that uses a lot of butter to tenderize it, and the self rising flour is too soft/low protein so it ended up falling apart – as have my daughters attempts to make it gluten free. It seems heretical, but we ended up having to use less butter. For myself I’m going back to the original with high protein flour and a lot of butter.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Millet, if your recipe calls for baking soda, then it’s not a great opportunity to use Self-Rising Flour since there’s baking powder already added to this flour (not baking soda). We don’t currently have a recipe for banana bread using Self-Rising Flour developed, but you could take a look at this selection of recipes that are designed to work with it to see if anything catches your eye. Kye@KAF

  34. Sabrina

    I promised to make a chiffon cake when I just realized that my AP flour has run out. But then I look up your blog and be thankful that I kept some SR flour, and decided to follow your advice on substituting AP for SR. But then, it turns out that it takes longer time for the dough to be fully baked and its somehow has a wetter texture than that of the usual one (I’ve used my recipe for a lot of times so I know how it turns out when using AP). In the recipe it is stated that it need 1/4 tablespoon of baking powder for 1 cup of AP flour. I didn’t add anymore baking powder since in your article it is said that it covers around 1/2 tablespoon of baking powder for each cup. Can you tell me what’s the problem?

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid

      Sabrina, the protein level in the AP flour is significantly higher than that of the SR. Self-Rising’s greater amount of starch hangs on to the liquid in the batter, giving you a wetter texture for the finished cake. Susan

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