Identity-preserved wheat: from field to flour

Do you know where your food comes from?

The farm to table movement has made us all more aware of eating good food – food that’s minimally processed, hasn’t traveled halfway around the world (and back again) to grace our tables, and whose raising has been kind to the environment.

But how often do you really know where your food comes from – unless you’re shopping at farmers’ markets, or growing/raising it yourself?

Without further ado, let us introduce you to King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour – now milled from identity-preserved wheat.

Identity-preserved wheat via @kingarthurflourAvailable now (or soon) in your local supermarket, this identity-preserved (IP) flour is produced from wheat grown within 200 miles of its Kansas mill.

Identity-preserved wheat via @kingarthurflour

The wheat growers are farmers we know and trust. Members of a local farmers’ cooperative, we’ve been working with many of them for years. They grow the white wheat and deliver it to the mill, where it’s ground into flour and packed in our King Arthur bags.

From there it’s an easy train ride to the warehouses serving your local supermarkets.

Identity-preserved wheat via @kingarthurflour

But this traceable path from field to flour isn’t all that distinguishes our IP white whole wheat. We’ve also worked with our farmers to ensure that the wheat is top quality – grown from certified seed, approved both for its optimum performance in the field, and its bakeability in your kitchen.

The wheat is grown using responsible farming methods. Through crop rotation and the use of cover crops; using low-water irrigation methods and not tilling (to reduce erosion), the farmers are good stewards of their land. Which means the land will be fertile for generations to come – producing the food that feeds us all.

Identity-preserved wheat via @kingarthurflour

Today is Earth Day. What better way to celebrate than to say a heartfelt thank you to our American farmers – and to welcome King Arthur identity-preserved white whole wheat flour to your kitchen.

Identity-preserved wheat via @kingarthurflour

 

Read more about identity-preserved white whole wheat flour.

Purchase online now.

Start baking with white whole wheat flour in your favorite recipes.

Our thanks to King Arthur Flour’s Julia Reed for the photos accompanying this blog post.

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!

comments

  1. Lisa

    Please see to it that your farmers stop using glyphosate entirely and test your products to ensure there is no glyphosate. The government allowing something to be ingested by millions of Americans as long as it’s less than 30 parts per million means nothing.

    Reply
  2. Kenneth Ciesla

    The use of round up needs to be banned entirely. I don’t care what the federal limits are. Permitting this chemical to be used at all is not assuring the best quality, but using a federal minimum as an excuse to produce sub-par products that poison people on many levels. As so long as this company uses round up, your name can never be associated as quality no matter the claim. Organic or not.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for taking a moment to share your thoughts, Kenneth. Your desire to see glyphosate (often referred to as RoundUp) banned from the market entirely is heard, along with your frustration. While the use of glyphosate on non-organic wheat is federally approved for use by farmers, our team continues to work thoughtfully with the farmers who supply our wheat. We’re particularly proud of innovations we’ve brought to our non-organic White Whole Wheat Flour, which is featured in this article. As part of our Field to Flour program, we’ve been able to introduce steps which allow traceability of the wheat back to the farm it’s sourced from and set specific guidelines around crop management. This includes not permitting the use of glyphosate as a pre-harvest application on the white winter wheat it’s milled from. In addition to this, we also continue to offer and support our full line of certified 100% organic flours, where the use of glyphosate is prohibited; as well as pursue other initiatives such as our recent partnership with Clif Bar to fund organic grain research. Our team takes to heart the fact that people care about the way their food is produced. It’s why we gladly offer options to suit different needs and why we’ll continue to work with our supply chain, from farmer to mill to bag, to ensure we’re offering the best products we can to our customers. Kindly, Jesse@KAF

  3. Kate

    King Aurther Flour. While you may watch all areas of growing the wheat that is supplied to your company the concern people have over glyphosate is very real.
    Since the 1990’s the “strict” regulation of Roundup has been allowed to expand by 400%.
    That will affect absorption outcomes in humans. I completely recommend you test your flour yourselves.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for reaching out and for your recommendation, Kate! I’ll be more than happy to share it with our team. Noting your concern about glyphosate, we think you’ll be interested in knowing that (along with the other requirements of our Identity Preservation program) farmers who grow the white winter wheat that’s milled into our White Whole Wheat Flour aren’t permitted to apply glyphosate to it as a pre-harvest application. Kindly, Jesse@KAF

  4. Jamie

    I have a question. Do you ever use anything of roundup at all? Just let you now roundup is made of chemicals. That is a reality. Let me now,

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Thanks for reaching out to us, Jamie. We do want to assure you that for all of our products, we start with our commitment to ensuring the highest quality possible. We partner with mills and farmers to produce flour that meets our high standards and specifications to ensure superior baking performance. For non-organic flours, glyphosate (commonly called Roundup) is federally approved for use by farmers. Any application must comply with its regulatory approval, and, if used, residual glyphosate levels in wheat should remain well below the federally mandated level for wheat of 30 parts per million. We do also offer a full line of 100% organic flours (http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/flours/organic-flours), where the use of synthetic chemicals, including glyphosate, is prohibited. We offer our organic line to ensure that our customers have options to suit their individual needs. Our organic flour line is also 100% US grown and milled wheat, independently verified by QAI (Quality Assurance International). If there’s anything else we can assist you with, please don’t hesitate to reach out to our friendly Customer Service Team at 800-827-6836. Kindly, Annabelle@KAF

  5. Gary

    But do the farmers that grow for them pre spray the crops with roundup to desiccate the wheat and make it dry up equally for more production.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      In addition to the other requirements of our Field-to-Flour identity-preservation program, our farmers are not permitted to use glyphosate (also referred to as RoundUp) as a pre-harvest application on the white winter wheat our White Whole Wheat Flour is milled from. Kindly, Jesse@KAF

  6. Jesse

    Hi ….I was wondering if your bread is not genetically modified…do you know if they spray the wheat with glycosphate…?

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Jesse! You mention our bread, but I hope I’m correct in guessing that you’re really referring to our flour.

      When it comes to our identity-preserved White Whole Wheat Flour (featured in the above article), our farmers are not permitted to use glyphosate as a pre-harvest application on the white winter wheat it’s milled from.

      Kindly,

      Jesse@KAF

  7. Carrie

    Please explain thoroughly what this repeated phrase means: …”farmers are not permitted to use glyphosate as a pre-harvest application on the white winter wheat that our White Whole Wheat Flour is milled from.” Does your phrase “pre-harvest application” leave semantic wiggle room for a “harvest application” of glyphosate? I am a long time user of King Arthur flour, but this chemical (FDA approved or not) is poisoning our children. If you as a company are permitting your farmers to use ANY glyphosate ANYWHERE in the production of your wheat you do us a disservice.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Carrie,

      Thanks for letting us know you have some additional questions about our identity-preserved White Whole Wheat Flour and glyphosate. There are two ways that glyphosate is federally permitted for use in regards to non-organic wheat. Pre-harvest application is a process by which farmers apply glyphosate directly to wheat when it’s nearing plant maturity and the plant has already shut down. At this stage, wheat kernel development is complete and the crop has matured. The intended purpose is to control weeds, and glyphosate cannot be applied in the fields where wheat is growing until it has entered what’s called the “hard dough stage” in order to prevent its uptake. This also has the affect of hastening the crop drying out prior to harvest. As we’d mentioned, farmers growing the white winter wheat used in our White Whole Wheat Flour are not permitted to use glyphosate this way.

      The second possible use of glyphosate is as an application to fields to prevent weed growth while wheat isn’t present there. Farmers who grow our white winter wheat retain this option while adhering to strict label guidance and regulations.

      For a certified guarantee against any application of glyphosate whatsoever, we do recommend customers choose from our full line of 100% organic of flours, where glyphosate is prohibited from any use.

      Kindly,

      Jesse@KAF

    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Trust and transparency are important to the way we do business, Kate. We want customers to make choices that are right for their diets, and which make them feel most comfortable. If synthetic chemicals are something you’re intent on avoiding, we recommend baking with the use of our certified 100% organic flours, where they’re prohibited. Our organic flour line is also 100% US grown and milled wheat, and independently verified by QAI (Quality Assurance International). Kindly, Jesse@KAF

  8. Sue Dow

    There is growing concern with Glyphosate. I appreciate an effort to clearly note products that were not produced with its use. I have read that it is now in the water, and crops may still be tainted with this chemical. I realize products will be more expensive grown with out it but would like the choice.

    Reply
  9. Melissa

    Is hard spring wheat the same as hard red whole wheat? I am confused as to why the red whole wheat doesn’t have spring or winter in the name.. what is the difference between white and red wheat? Google isn’t making it easy on me.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Hi Melissa, we understand it can be confusing, but let’s see if we can help clear some of the confusion up. Hard spring wheat is the kind of wheat that makes our Bread Flour. Hard red winter wheat is what makes our traditional Whole Wheat Flour. Wheat berries come in different colors, just like other kinds of plants. Think of red tulips and white tulips: same plant, different colors. The red wheat berries make up the darker Whole Wheat Flour, while the white wheat berries make up our White Whole Wheat Flour. We hope that helps! Kye@KAF

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