Easy Herb Biscuits: Our Never-Fail Biscuits go green for the summer

Never-Fail Biscuits are just what their name proclaims: you absolutely, positively can’t goof up this biscuit recipe, no matter how suspect you believe your biscuit-baking skills to be. And now that summer’s here, it’s simple to punch up these two-ingredient biscuits with a handful of chopped fresh herbs: Easy Herb Biscuits, here we come!

Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme… If you’re a Boomer, you may remember the 1966 Simon and Garfunkel album by that name. These days, “record album” is one of those quaint names that’s just about disappeared from our tech-laced lexicon. As is “home ec,” which is where I first attempted to make biscuits.

For those of you too young to remember when middle school was called junior high, “home ec” refers to home economics, a required course for junior high girls. For boys, the designated class was industrial arts (a.k.a. shop). Girls didn’t take shop; boys didn’t take home ec. We weren’t gender-biased; that’s just the way it was back then.

So, we girls were supposed to learn how to sew, cook, and behave ourselves in polite company. But by the late ’60s, when I was in junior high, Emily Post-type proper behavior was disappearing in a tsunami of Woodstock and war protests, hippies and the Haight.

Still, even if we didn’t buy in to raised pinky fingers and china tea cups, we did like to eat – what 13-year-old doesn’t?

And while Mrs. Deabler, my home ec. teacher, ripped out every seam I ever sewed, she couldn’t fault my baking powder biscuits. Even back then I was a foodie.

These days, I never make the classic biscuits that saved me from abject failure back in home ec. Having to go buy buttermilk, working butter and shortening into flour (oh, be gentle!), patting, smoothing, cutting, re-rolling the scraps… meh, I’ve no time for that.

Give me these Never-Fail Biscuits any day. Mix self-rising flour and heavy cream. Plop dough balls onto a baking sheet. Scan Facebook for 10 minutes while the biscuits bake. Enjoy!

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Now’s the perfect time to turn these biscuits into something a bit more savory. Fresh herbs are growing rampant in my garden. Currently chives and thyme are front and center; but parsley, sage, and rosemary are on their way.

#TBT! I’ll be humming some Simon and Garfunkel along with iMusic as I throw together (literally) this biscuit dough and enjoy Easy Herb Biscuits.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Put 1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached Self-Rising Flour in a bowl.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Chop up enough fresh herbs to yield about 3 tablespoons.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Stir into the flour.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Add 3/4 cup heavy cream.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Stir to make a cohesive dough. If necessary, drizzle in additional cream to make the dough come together.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Scoop out biscuits.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Plop onto a parchment-lined (or lightly greased) baking sheet.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Brush with extra cream,  if desired.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Bake in a preheated 450°F oven for 10 minutes.

Easy Herb Biscuits via @kingarthurflour

Instant gratification!

Honestly, it takes just about as long to put these biscuits on the table as it does to listen to “Light My Fire” and “Hey Jude.”

And taste? “Green Onions,” followed by “Whole Lotta Love.”

See this recipe’s step-by-step video:

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!

comments

  1. Annette

    Your “easy herb biscuits” link takes you to the “never fail” biscuits. I guess the point is to add 3 TBS of fresh chopped herbs. 🙂

    Reply
  2. Alice Lindborg

    Thanks for all the wonderful dairy products that are in these delicious recipes! I’m a dairy farmer from Indiana and love to bake. We are out here in the heat this week making sure the product gets to market cold and fresh. The cows don’t love the heat any more than people do, but this too shall pass.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Alice, thank YOU (and your cows) for all the hard work and dedication you all put into producing delicious dairy for us. Here’s wishing you something nice and cold (a tall glass of milk?) to pair with your herb biscuits. Mollie@KAF

  3. Pattymac

    YUMMY!!! I was the last wave of High School Home EC classes in the 80s. I LOVED that class! I still remember making biscuits though not what recipe we used. I have a no fail recipe I always made but mom accidentally threw it out, and I cannot find anything like it again. AGONY!!!! So I’ll give these a whirl. Certainly enough lovely herbs in the garden right now.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Theresa, the added fat in the heavy cream contributes significantly to the moistness and tenderness of these biscuits. You might have better luck substituting almond or soy milk into a biscuit recipe that calls for regular milk and butter. You could certainly add fresh herbs to this type of recipe and substitute a non-dairy margarine such as Earth Balance Vegan Buttery Sticks for the butter. Here’s a biscuit recipe that I think would work well for this. Barb@KAF

  4. Mary

    Made these this morning with a mixture of herbs from the garden plus a little cheddar. They were very good.

    A few comments:

    I used just a little rosemary but it was the dominating taste. I love rosemary so that was fine but if I was using just rosemary I probably would not use three full tablespoons. My mixture was two kinds of thyme, lemon and French, a lot of
    chives and a little rosemary.

    I added a little cheese, which was good, but I needed some extra cream.

    I didn’t brush the tops with cream; next time I will. They were very pale on top.

    Has anyone tried these with dill. I love dill but don’t have enough yet in the garden. The deer ate my first planting. They usually don’t bother the herbs but apparently they like dill (and hostas and sunflowers)

    All in all the biscuits were a success.

    Reply

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