Glass or metal or stoneware: Which is the "right" pan?

When it’s time to bake, you reach for the pan you have, often without thinking about what it’s made of. If your recipe calls for a 9″ x 5″ loaf pan, you grab the one in your cupboard and fill ‘er up. What might surprise you is that your results can be dramatically different, depending on whether you’ve baked your recipe in a glass or metal pan. Stoneware, another common material in bakers’ kitchens, has its own set of behaviors.

Glass or metal or stoneware? Does the pan you bake in make a difference? You bet! Click To Tweet

Let’s explore how the pan you’re baking in can change your results.

glass or metal via@kingarthurflour

Glass or metal pan? It’s all about heat transfer

When you put something in the oven to bake, the ideal scenario is for a smooth, even transfer of the oven’s heat from the air around your pan through its sides and in turn, through the batter or dough within. As the ingredients warm up, the magic happens. Leaveners are activated, things rise and are eventually set in their finished form, all while the kitchen smells heavenly.

The ideal vessel for baking in most cases is a light-colored pan made from a metal that’s an efficient heat conductor. (Read more about pan colors and their effect on baking.)

Aluminum is the material that most professionals reach for.

glass or metal via@kingarthurflour

Glass pans are extremely common – and they have advantages of their own – but be aware that they are insulators. Glass slows the flow of heat between the oven’s air and your batter, until the glass itself heats up. Then the glass retains heat far longer than metal will.

Because of these properties, batter baked in glass often takes longer. At the same time, it’s easier to over-bake brownies in a glass pan, because it takes longer for the center to cook. By the time the center finishes, the glass is acting like a heat sink, and the outer edges of your brownies are getting very tall and probably pretty hard.

What’s good about glass? It’s non-reactive, which means it won’t corrode from the acid in your lemon cake, or change the flavor of anything you bake in it. You can see through it, which is great for pie crusts; just peek underneath! And once glass heats up, it will do a good job of making sure bottom crusts get crisp and golden.

Stoneware: the wild card

After doing some research, I learned why I’ve had such inconsistent results with stoneware. With this kind of pan, it’s all about the composition of the clay, and in some cases, how it’s made.

Hand-thrown pie plates will bake differently than a stoneware pan made from liquid slip poured into a mold. A hand-thrown plate is likely to have more air pockets in it, which will slow down heat transfer. The amount of minerals and metals in the clay itself also determines the rate at which heat can move through the pan.

glass or metal via@kingarthurflour

The brownie bakeoff

We make several batches of our Fudge Brownie recipe, and bake them side by side in the same oven for the same amount of time.

See the edge of the glass pan batch climbing up and curling inward? The glass heats up more slowly than metal, melting the sugar in the batter. Once the glass is hot, it holds on to the heat instead of transmitting it inward. The hotter edge causes the batter to climb higher and cook further than the batter in the other pans.

glass or metal via@kingarthurflour

Brownie lineup, left to right: corner pieces baked in metal, stoneware, and glass.

As you can see, the different shapes and dimensions of the pans give some distinct differences when you line them up.

All three brownies have nice, shiny tops. The metal pan is a true 8″ square. The stoneware pans’ sides are slightly sloped, and the dimensions are more like 8 1/2″ square, so the batter is spread a little thinner.

The glass pan shows the most dramatic difference between the top and bottom dimensions, but the curve you see at the back of the brownie is on display, as well as the downhill slope toward the brownie’s inner corner. The outside edge of this brownie is much crunchier and harder than brownies from the stoneware or metal pans.

glass or metal via@kingarthurflour

Pound cake prospects

Pound cake is a high-sugar, high-fat formula that takes more than an hour to cook all the way through. As this lineup of cakes shows, reaching for glass or metal or stoneware will change the way the cake bakes. The shapes of these pans are different, with glass having the widest span across the top.

It’s interesting to note that the dome of the glass-baked cake is the lowest; that’s a function of slower heat transfer. The outside edge also shows the rounded, souffléd edge we saw on the brownies. The taller tops of the metal and stoneware cakes are a result of the heat traveling faster from edge to the center, activating the leavener before the center set and sending the middle upward.

glass or metal via@kingarthurflour

Surprising slices

The cross-section of these cakes are a surprise at first. I expected the glass slice to have the darkest, thickest crust, but the reverse is true.

On further reflection, I realize the insulating properties of the glass protect the bottom edge to a degree. The metal and stoneware pans have darker edges; as the heat moves through the batter, it helps the tops get higher, but the sugar and fat in the formula cook more efficiently (and get darker) where they’re in contact with the pans.

glass or metal via @kingarthurflour

Choosing the right pan

King Arthur Flour recipes are tested in metal pans, for their baking efficiency and accuracy for size. Glass pans’ dimensions can be all over the place (try taking a measuring tape to the store next time you shop; you might be surprised). Stoneware composition varies too much to rely on for testing (different levels of conductivity and sizes are often not exact).

That said, any pan is the right pan if it helps you put baked goods in the oven. The standard advice for baking in glass is to lower the oven temperature by 25°F from what the recipe calls for, and bake up to 10 minutes longer. The hard edges we see here are more pronounced in high-sugar, high-fat recipes; your casserole or bread pudding are less likely to be adversely affected.

Stoneware just takes some getting to know; once you learn how your pan bakes, you can make any adjustments that work for you. And you can always reach out to the Baker’s Hotlineif you’re not sure where to start.

Let us know what your favorite baking pan is made of, and what you’re baking in it, in the comments below.

Susan Reid
About

Chef Susan Reid grew up in New Jersey, graduated from Bates College and the Culinary Institute of America, and is presently the Food Editor of Sift magazine. She does demos, appearances, and answers food (and baking) questions from all quarters.

comments

  1. Dolores F. Arendall

    Very , Very interesting !! I like the metal and stoneware for my quickbreads . They always turn out great.

    Reply
  2. Sharon Kunz

    I’ve heard many, many times stoneware is naturally non-stick. i’ve never had good luck with stoneware. I have a few stoneware pans, different shapes, different manufacturers/artists. Everything sticks unless I spray it. As you did your testing, did you spray the stoneware? Is stoneware actually non stick?
    Thanks for the article. I will make my brownies in a metal pan from now on, I used to use glass and the sides would get overdone before the middle was done. Now i know, i was using the wrong pan.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Sharon. I wouldn’t think of stoneware as being necessarily nonstick; when I bake in it I always spray it beforehand. And as I said, depending on the maker and the glaze they’ve chosen, all bets can be off. I’m glad the post was useful to you! Susan

    2. Sharon Haile

      You need to season your stoneware. Never spray it. Season it with a fat or oil. Never use soap on stoneware. I had one piece is stoneware from a store and I hated it. It left a horrible taste in my food. It didn’t bake right, either. I have 7-8 pieces of stoneware from a direct sales company and I love them. They are the best. They cook/bake perfectly and nothing ever sticks to them. Ever. In the beginning I always season them or cook a high fat food in or on them until they are seasoned. The darker the stoneware gets as you use it, the better the pan. Think of stoneware like cast iron. Btw…I do not rep for that company where I buy my stoneware from. It’s just the best and I will never buy stoneware from anywhere else. Stoneware also holds the heat so like when baking cookies, they might still be soft and gooey but leaving them in the stoneware pan for 2 minutes after taking them out, they will continue to bake. Good luck! I love my stoneware!

    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Barbara. Yes, it behaves pretty much the same way glass does; it’s just opaque instead of see through. Susan

  3. Rusty

    I really appreciate this post. Now I know my brownies are never quite right..that glass pan !! Keep up the great work helping us “amateurs”. And by the way, your Hotline is the best.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      So glad to be of service, Rusty, thanks. And the bakers on the hotline say thanks, too! Susan

  4. nightsmusic

    Always metal for baked goods and glass for my meatloaf. Because of the conductivity of the glass, the meatloaf bakes quickly but stays moist in glass as opposed to metal where the loaf ended up with a ‘crust’ on it and the interior was dry. I think it just cooks too quickly in the metal pan.

    Reply
  5. Sharon Rist

    I knew about the pans for baking, specially breads. I have a different question. I have a electric stove/oven. I had a gas stove/oven before we moved. Now I am having problem with baking sourdough in the electric oven. Which oven is used for your baking of breads? Is there anything I can do to reproduce a gas oven baking ability?

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Sharon. We do most of our testing in electric ovens, and when building kitchens for baking I prefer electric. That said, we have one gas oven in the test kitchen that is very steady and reliable. If you don’t have a separate oven thermometer in your electric oven, that’s the first step, because it might not be giving you an accurate temperature. Most electric ovens can be adjusted from the control panel if they’re only a little bit off; manuals for almost every model of oven can be found online. Another thing you may want to try is to put a pizza stone in your oven and just leave it there; it will act as a heat sink and stabilize the oven’s temperature for baking sourdough. Susan

  6. Susan

    What about cast iron? I have a cast iron loaf pan and a divided round pan (for scones or individual slices of baked items – sorry, that’s the best way to describe it!) – any suggestions or tips on using those two items? Thank you and may you all have a Happy Easter (and a fun April Fool’s day – looking forward eagerly to that infamous post!)

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Love cast iron, Susan. I would use it more for yeast breads than quick breads. The acidity of something like a pumpkin bread could react with the cast iron, and give you an off flavor as well as not doing any good to the seasoning on the pan. But yeast dough in cast iron, especially a high hydration dough, gets an amazing crust. I have several divided cast iron pans, and there is nothing better for cornbread and biscuits. I would not be above putting some cheese roll dough in them, either. As far as where it rates for conductivity, it’s not as good as aluminum and not as poor as glass for heat transfer. Susan

  7. Barbara Hennard

    I didn’t realize there was such a difference in baking results until I accidently did a comparison a few years ago. I had lots of “Friendship” quick bread to make and not enough loaf pans. I used my aluminum and stone wear loaf pans and decided to try using my grandmothers loaf pan which I concluded must be tin. (Early to mid 1900’s.) I baked several loaves over several days and each loaf baked for a different time and had different results. I was puzzled and finally concluded that the tin pan was terrible for baking modern recipes. So, fun to look at but will repurpose for something other than baking. Thanks for the interesting article. I will certainly pay closer attention to what pan I will use for various recipes.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      That’s a great story, Barbara. I’ve gotten in the habit of putting a parchment paper sling in almost every loaf pan I bake in, and when trying out uncharted equipment it has saved me more than once. I am always on the lookout for antique baking tools, so the tin is fascinating to me. Thanks for sharing! Susan

  8. e

    I bought a silicon pan intending to use for salted caramel shortbread (which is very sticky even in a parchment-lined metal pan). Haven’t used it yet. What might I expect?

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hey, Eileen. See the response to Cea above. I think that it’s worth giving it a go, especially because salted caramel anything is worth the quest. Shortbread is usually a low and slow bake, which in this case is where I would go anyway. Try baking at 300°F, and if you have uneven browning drop to 275°F and let it go for longer. Let us know how it goes! Susan

    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Cea. Silicone is a much more efficient insulator than glass; it really interferes with the transfer of heat. When it first came out, we tested almost a dozen silicone loaf pans, and they were all, without fail, a disaster. There’s a very good reason there are no silicone loaf pans out there anymore, except at yard sales. Ditto for an 8″ square pan, and those are the recipes I needed to show to make the point about heat transfer.

      Silicone is nonstick, and there are some very specific applications in the kitchen where it is a champion. It’s excellent for high sugar applications like florentines; it’s insulating properties help sugar to caramelize evenly, and the bake time there is short enough that overcooking isn’t a risk. Silicone is also excellent for custards, which bake at a low temperature and where slow heat transfer is an asset. I also use silicone for frozen items in unusual shapes. The flexibility of the material makes it a breeze to release them from the mold. Susan

    2. Margy

      Susan, I agree with you about the silicone pans. Terrible for baking, but great to use in non-baking applications where you need to have ease of unmolding. I have a half-round mold with 6 wells that I use to make ice cream bombes and frozen mousse bombes.

    3. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Margy. The molds are also good for things like fancy compound butters, or tile cups. They’re easy to store, too. Susan

  9. Jas

    Thanks for the informative post!
    A hint to baking brownies in a glass pan: take them out of the oven while you have a spot in the center ( about 2 inches in diameter) that ‘s still undercooked. As the glass retains heat much longer, it will continue to cook out of the oven. The chewy edges are a bonus!

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      I know there are a lot of folks who adore that texture on the outside of brownies; if you’re an edge person, glass can deliver like none other! And you make a good point about carryover cooking; mostly I use it in meats, but you’re right, for brownies in glass, it works! Susan

  10. Lorraine Fina Stevenski

    I have an assortment of pan types for loaf baking. My favorite pan is natural aluminum made by Analon. Don’t think they exist any longer? I spray with canola and then line the bottom with parchment. The trick is heat. Most of my loaf baking takes about 1 hour. The first 30 minutes I bake at 350 degrees. The remainder is at 325 degrees. This insures a baked through and not burnt bake.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Lorraine, good to hear from you! Analon has moved mostly to anodized finishes, but the “natural” you’re talking about is really just plain aluminum, and Magic Line pans have the same surface. I like your technique of lowering the oven to let a loaf finish through; I will be giving it a try on my next quick bread! Susan

    2. Marsha

      Would that work with pound cake? My aluminum (dark) pan slightly overbaked my pound cake. I used my convection oven set at 325 it automatically bakes at 300.

    3. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Marsha. If you convection allows you to turn off the fan, I recommend doing so for something like a pound cake. The fan makes heat transfer more efficient, and pound cake formulas take such a long time to bake, it’s difficult to avoid overdone edges, even at that lower temperature with the fan in play. Susan

  11. sandy

    Thanks Susan. This post is a great follow-up to PJs quick bread post. I have always had disappointing results from either glass or dark metal loaf pans and was thinking about buying a light colored metal loaf pan. This post makes me think that is the way to go for me. I do have good luck with brownies. I bake them in a light colored metal layer cake pan. I line the bottom with a parchment round and then flip the brownie round out of the pan like you do a cake layer. I serve on a pretty cake plate and I cut the brownies into wedges not squares. Very pretty that way and there are no over baked corners.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      That is a great idea for an easy dessert that you know everyone will absolutely love, Sandy. Glad you enjoyed the post. Susan

  12. Nirvana

    I found that my cinnabuns darkened too quickly in a glass casserole dish (but were under baked) as compared to when I use a stoneware casserole dish.

    Reply
  13. Beth Van Houten

    I love the chewy edge of brownies baked in Corningware, but I have noticed that when I use baking spray (Pam for Baking, specificallly), the edge seems to curl into the product even more than usual.The resulting product is fine to eat but looks ugly, almost like one of those stuffed crust pizzas. Any advice? (I don’t use parchment because my corningware is oval rather than rectangular…but I am willing to switch pans if I need to.)

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      If not greasing the pan seems like it would end in disaster, Beth, parchment will be a great solution. Even if your pan is an oval shape, you can still cut a couple wide strips of parchment to lay across each side and make somewhat of a parchment “sling” that you’ll be able to lift out when they’re done. Let us know how it goes! Annabelle@KAF

  14. Denise

    Can you bake a cake in a tart pan? I was thinking about a vegan carrot cake in a tart pan of the same size they recommended.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Sure, Denise. One thing to be careful of: if your tart pan has a removable bottom, I recommend you line it with parchment before putting your cake batter in it! Susan

  15. Vic

    Dark metal pans 9×5 or shiny aluminum pans 8×4 are my choice.

    I always spray my pans.

    I also proofed my dough in a Anchor Hocking bowl. Then on the second proof I decided to try to bake it in another clean Anchor Hocking bowl. I am new to baking bread and wanted to see what happens. The bread turned out looking like a curling puck 🙂 and took 2x as long to bake. The bread turned out delicious although it was hard to figure out the best way to cut it.

    Reply
  16. Kathleen

    This is an interesting article. I use metal for my baking, but it would be interesting to try stoneware. I have a few glass pans, but I don’t think about using them too much, Thanks for giving me the lowdown on these pans,

    Reply
  17. flfg

    I own 5 steel bread pans bought from now-defunct Walnut Acres nearly 50 years ago. They are my only bread pans, except for a pullman bread pan bought from King Arthur. I love them, and can’t imagine baking bread in any other pan. Maybe I’ve just learned to bake in them, but they seem just right to me. I probably won’t be tinkering with any other pans.

    Reply
  18. Leila Bassett

    Thank you for the great article. Have you done any testing with stainless steel pans? I have been looking at going away from aluminum and more towards cast iron and stainless steel.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Leila. Stainless steel, other than in limited applications where slow heat transfer/heat retention is an advantage (artisan breads, pizza) is not great for baking quick breads. It bakes much the same as glass, and depending on how heavy the gauge of the steel, can be worse for retaining heat and burning edges with underdone centers. It might not be so bad for something like cookies, if you have a lighter weight, but the bottoms will be at risk. A Silpat, if you have one, could give you a margin of safety there.
      If the idea of food contact with aluminum bothers you, you can do what we do and line loaf or 9 x 13″ pans with parchment before filling and baking. You’d be amazed at how much easier it is to cut those things when you can lift them out of the pan in one quick motion and cut them on a board instead of inside the pan. Susan

  19. Marjie

    I love my KAF stoneware Tea Loaf pan for quick breads. They bake beautifully, and I love the smaller slice dimensions. I gave one to my brother-in-law who has, in turn, given them as gifts to many friends.

    My silicone Madeleine pans are magnificent.

    Reply
  20. Cecilia

    My favorite baking pan is a 9 x 13 heavy aluminum pan with handles
    It was one of my grandmothers pans. It is old and does not have a non stick finish. I grease it with Cisco
    Cinnamon rolls and cakes baked in it are wonderful

    Reply
  21. Carly D

    I have used glass pans as my mother had for years without problems by reducing the heat and increasing the time. BUT not I have received a gold metal pan from a large kitchen company and not sure how it will work. Have you tried these?

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Carly. I’m not sure what you mean by a gold metal pan; if it’s a gold-finished interior All-Clad, those are wonderful to clean and have an aluminum core that helps them bake quite evenly. They take a little more time than aluminum and will take less time than glass; use the recipe’s specified oven temperature and check for doneness 5 minutes before the lower bake time given (you can always bake it more). Susan

  22. Linda

    My favorite baking pans, and cookware in general, are non-coated, shiny stainless steel pans. I’ve had great results whether it’s cookies, breads or whathaveyou. My oven/stove runs on propane, if that makes a difference. Any thoughts about stainless steel pans? I can’t ever remember seeing anyone comment on their use. It’s seems aluminum, stone, or glass that gets the attention.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Linda. Having had to bake in stainless steel pans in restaurant kitchen for years because there was no other option, I can say I am not a fan. They are much worse conductors of heat than aluminum, they’re very heavy, the corners are never square, so you end up with a large area of not-appetizing overdone cornbread or coffeecake….anyway, you get the idea. That said, restaurant hotel pans are probably a much heavier gauge of stainless steel than what you have in your kitchen. The only stainless pan I have to bake in is an All-Clad 8″ square, and that has an aluminum core for conductivity. Even so, it takes 5 minutes longer to bake than the same recipe baked next to it in an aluminum 8″ square pan. If you like the results that you’re getting, by all means, stay with what you have! I can say I am a fan of our baking steel for pizza, though; it gives great results for flatbreads and artisan loaves.

  23. Mae Nikaido

    I just had a disaster baking a banana-orange loaf: pan(9×5) non-disposable, aluminum pan. Rose nice and high, too high I surmised. When tested with a pick, it tested clean so took it out to cool. It subsequently dropped in the center which resulted in a non-baked center. If I had to bake longer, it would have been overly browned. Would the hot start and turning down the heat system work better?

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Couple of things about this, Mae. It sounds to me like there may have been too much baking soda in your recipe, reacting with all the acid from the banana and orange, which is why it got so tall so fast. I always test quick breads with a paring knife. The larger surface area of the blade gives you a lot more accurate read on the doneness of the center than a pick, which can betray you, as you found out. In the case of your loaf, if you had known that the center wasn’t quite finished (raw batter still on the knife when you pulled it out), you could have covered it with foil and dropped the temperature by 25°F until you knew for sure that the cake was done. Don’t give up! FYI, baking soda shouldn’t be more than a quarter teaspoon per cup of flour in the recipe. Susan

  24. Ciao Carole

    I love to bake quick and yeast breads in Emile Henry Burgundy clay. Cakes go in Gold Touch or Wilton aluminum pans, Nordicware for bundts and cakelts. None of these ever stick…no parchment.

    Reply
  25. Karen Boettge

    How about Bundt pans? My grandmother’s was heavy duty and weighed twice my mother’s darker nonstick aluminum (1970s) – now I see the gold-colored Bundt pans. Any thoughts on these? Thanks! Karen

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Karen. It sounds like your grandmother’s pan was probably cast iron, which is fine for a Bundt. Lodge is reissuing replicas of those classic pans again. The darker nonstick aluminum ones from the 70s were trying to replicate the original cast iron in a lighter, less expensive material (dark inside, but lighter walls by weight). Today’s aluminum Bundt pans have gone to a heavier casting, but lighter colored interiors, so the longer bakes of those pans don’t result in overdone, crusty sides. Susan

  26. Rose

    I used 2 different types of pans when I made your Hamburger Buns recipe the other night. One pan was a dark aluminum the other was a sheet pan that I had a Silpat liner which is the same material as the silicone I believe. Well the results were quite different on the bottom. The aluminum pan gave a darker crust and the Silpat gave me a light blond crust to no color crust. Think I will only use the Silpat when making cookies in the future. That was my experiment. Normally, I use dark aluminum or my light aluminum pans. I do use a piece of steel when I am making bagettes I have a bakers steel plate that I use with parchment which works quite well. I have cracked to many pizza stones and switched to the steel.
    Love the April Fools pictures of the baking disasters, my last week went into the garbage can (it was not one of your recipes I want to add).

    Reply
  27. Rita C.

    The pan I love more than ANY I have is black carbon steel, and I use it for sweet breads and loaf bread.

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Hi, Jen. Le Creuset would behave like glass and cast iron; slow to heat up, but a good heat retainer. Good for high hydration doughs in general, where you’re looking for a crust with some oomph to it. Susan

    1. Susan Reid, post author

      If you’re baking in a loaf pan, metal is fine; if you’re doing a no-knead or large boule, I’d go with a dutch oven or large casserole, if you have it. Susan

  28. Tom

    Interesting. I tend to use glass for all my breads (don’t make many other baked goods except occasionally brownies). I also have some cast iron loaf pans that are used but I’ve never tested the results directly against the glass. Size and shape of the sides, it seems to me, can also impact the final results and the rise. Of course, cornbread is ALWAYS in a preheated cast iron skillet.

    Reply
  29. John McNelly

    I have come to baking loaf yeast breads almost exclusively in cast iron pots/skillets/dutch ovens. I also prefer to use Bundt pans for baking loaf quick breads when that is appropriate. I also am a solid fan of using my Thermopen instant-read thermometer when cooking and baking for EVERYTHING from meats and baked goods and liquids and all else in between. It is the way to go….

    Reply
  30. John McNelly

    I should have added to my previous comments that my choice for a standard loaf pan is light-colored, heavy-gauge sheet aluminum.

    Reply
  31. Laura

    I wish I had learned to make bread but although I tried several times, I never had any luck whatsoever with bread baking, alas. Whenever I look at the yummy breads on the King Arthur website, I always want to try again but since I have no one around me who bakes bread, to show me step by step, I’m afraid to give it another try. My favorite bread is sourdough and I was wondering if there’s an easy-peasy recipe for this one (or any type of bread) that is virtually foolproof, or isn’t there such a thing in bread baking?

    Reply
    1. Susan Reid, post author

      Actually, Laura, there is. I’d recommend for your first try to go with a no-knead recipe. Make sure your yeast is fresh and not a rapid or quick-rise type. From there it’s a matter of measuring, stirring (the dough will be pretty wet and on the sticky side), then dumping it into a casserole dish and baking. If you can get that to work (and they’re very tasty breads), you can build your confidence for pan loaves. Start with our no-knead crusty white bread and you can always call or chat with us on the baker’s hotline if you get intimidated! Susan

  32. Debra Getting

    Has anyone compared silicone loaf pans to the others? Would you recommend spraying them, coating them with oil or butter or leave them plain, before putting the batter in for quick breads or loaf cakes?

    Ive tried spraying with Pam in the past but cleaning them, unless I used a spritz of hydrogen peroxide and a dusting of baking soda, then leaving them sit for about 10 minutes and then washing them with dish soap was the only way to get the residue off of them.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Great question, Debra. We’ve found that silicone pans are not all created equal, and that each one takes some trial and error in figuring out ideal temperatures and baking times. As you’ve noticed, silicone pans are very hard to clean, so the manufacturer typically recommends baking without any greasing or pan spray. Annabelle@KAF

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