April fools in the kitchen: our rocky road to foolproof recipes

Welcome to the 11th annual edition of April Fools in the Kitchen — where your King Arthur Flour test kitchen bakers demonstrate, once again, our selfless dedication to progress through failure — in all its glorious culinary guises.

Even the pros in the King Arthur Flour test kitchen blunder, bumble, and fail. See the results here. Click To Tweet

Let’s jump right into yeast bread.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

As someone did here. That towering balloon of rising dough was just itching to be slapped down. Who did it? DNA was inconclusive, but we think we might have some palm prints…

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Yeast does have a way of having its way — always. Even when seemingly confined in a lidded pain de mie pan.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Sometimes it’s not the bread that acts out, it’s the filling — “out” being the key concept here.

Still, if anything is ever going to escape the gluten-y clutches of its intended home, let it be melted cheese. I think this loaf is laughing at me…

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

What goes up must come down…

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

And sometimes what goes up must stay up, and never mind what’s happening over there on the other side, right?

There’s going up — and then there’s staying down: WAY down.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

This actually isn’t a failure at all: it’s my preferred method for disposing of the “discard” excess sourdough starter you end up with during the feeding process. This is several days’ worth of dried excess. My husband, Rick, thought it was the beginning of pizza; he was disabused of the notion when he snitched a taste.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

And here’s a loaf that was destined for sourdough bread perfection — until it spent some time in an oven with an over-zealous top element. Talk about a burning question…

Q: What happens when you fill a Berry Blitz Torte with whipped cream and berries and walk away?

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

This happens. Dang, I KNEW I should have used pastry cream!

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

My fellow baker Susan Reid had one of those “walk away” moments with her cake as well. You just can’t trust these layer cakes — they’re real slippery characters!

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Filled bundt cake, test #1: chocolate cheesecake filling. More like chocolate cheesecake spilling.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Filled bundt cake, test #2: vanilla cheesecake filling. MIGHT have been OK — had I remembered to put the baking powder in the cake. Talk about lowered expectations…

And then there was the time Aime and I got together to make a birthday cake for fellow digital team member Tracy, a pumpkin lover whose birthday falls on — you guessed it, Halloween.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Clearly, neither Aime nor I possess the Martha Stewart gene. While the cake started out looking OK (and I confess to extending the reach of that word here), it quickly developed some gaping cracks.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

We cut a few slices, and one side toppled, glacier-like, onto the plate.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Still, did that stop anyone on the team from enjoying a pumpkin-face fudge birthday cake with peanut butter frosting?

Of course not! Nothing stands in the way of duty: sampling every cake to make sure it’s just as good as it can be. Taste-wise, at least.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Can you guess what this is? No, I couldn’t either, until my fellow blogger, MaryJane, clued me in: homemade maraschino cherries left in the oven overnight. Shirley Temple, anyone?

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

How about this — any guesses? Sorry, can’t confirm one way or the other; no one would ‘fess up to having anything to do with… whatever this is!

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Does lower-protein flour + extra butter + forgetting the egg make EXTRA-tender pancakes? (They really did taste good, though.)

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Speaking of breakfast plates, how about this selection of banana bread one-offs? The best place for this tower of treats is probably the mess hall!

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Ah, banana bread; as our Recipe of the Year, you’ve been on my mind (and in my oven) a lot. Clearly, this version didn’t spend quite enough time in the oven. Still, it’s awfully goo(d)!

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Pumpkin pie, deconstructed.

This is what happens when you need a gorgeous picture of a perfect slice of pumpkin pie, and you didn’t cool the pie quite enough, so that perfect slice just ain’t happening.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

And apple pie, reconstructed.

I could tell you what I was trying to achieve here, but clearly I fell far short of my goal. Unless you’ve interested in apple pie that looks eerily reminiscent of a spatchcocked chicken.

April Fools in the Kitchen via @kingarthurflour

Finally, because there’s just nothing better than apple pie, enjoy a slice on us. Like many of our test kitchen experiments, this pie went slightly awry.

Still, beauty is only crust deep. And the true beauty of this pie is that it illustrates our King Arthur Flour test kitchen motto: We make mistakes so you don’t have to!

Happy April Fool’s baking, one and all! Don’t be shy; share your favorite baking disaster stories in comments, below.

Ready for some more chuckles? See a complete decade of our April Fool’s posts.

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!

comments

  1. Karen

    how funny seeing you guys screw up like i do sometimes! I have eaten a cake out of the pan with a spoon because I couldn’t get it out, my bread collapses at times and cakes and other things are ruined – glad to see you guys are human too 🙂

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Karen, totally human and prone to things like answering the phone, looking at Facebook, talking to people passing by — all of the things any of us do at home, we do in the test kitchen as well. That’s the best way to test recipes, too — put them in real-life context. Bake on, right? PJH@KAF

    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Always happy to share, Rosa — it never hurts to laugh at yourself, does it? PJH@KAF

    2. suzanne swanson

      It is quarter until 2 in the morning and I am laughing out loud reading this. My dogs cannot figure out what is wrong with me! I LOVED IT!!!!!

  2. Jill in TX

    I forgot the sugar in my pumpkin pie last Thanksgiving. It took a few bites to get it, but once the pie to whipped cream ratio slid toward pie, we all stopped eating and started laughing.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Sounds a little… vegetable-y, Jill. It ould take a lot of whipped cream to totally hide the lack of sugar in a pumpkin pie! PJH@KAF

    2. Nina in Sandy Hook, Conn.

      I once forgot sugar in the pumpkin pie. Then I took maple syrup from fridge, poked holes in the pie with a fork, & poured the syrup over the surface — maybe 1/3 of a cup. It was very tasty.

  3. Jo

    Just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed seeing your food truck in Raleigh yesterday! It was lots of fun taking pictures of the truck and spending time with one of your wonderful employees…she spent so much time talking to me and I told her I was huge fan and supporter of your products! Look forward to seeing the truck again. Have a Blessed Easter🐣🌷🌞

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Hope you had a good Easter too, Jo. Thanks for your kind words about our bake truck and crew — PJH@KAF

  4. waikikirie

    Always enjoy the April Fool post. Makes me feel less inadequate when the pros mess up too. Thanks for making all the mistakes, so that mine are minimal….xoxoxo

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Waikikirie, you KNOW we live to make you a better baker, right? 🙂 Nice to see your name here, as always. PJH@KAF

  5. Barbara Collins

    This is too funny. More like pitiful!! Thanks for sharing. I always think evreybody is such a perfect baker.

    Reply
  6. Cecilia Stein

    Thank you for this! Actually, the spatchcock apple pie looks similar to many of my pies made with gluten free pastry. For me, so many disasters, but few non edible in some fashion. I did drop an unbaked cake layer all over the floor….glass dish did not survive. Washed floor, cleaned up mess. (9 months pregnant.) Meanwhile, toddler ‘broke into’ my biscuit mix and was “playing in the sand, Mommy.’ On my still wet floor. Or the time same kid got the food colors and hid under the table and painted himself and the surrounding areas in pure liquid color. He has been a professional artist for 25 years, so far.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Cecilia, look at the good start you gave him! He might not have made it as an artist without those food colors and that biscuit mix… Though I can just see him on the wet floor, happy as a clam while you’re just finishing your cleaning… Sigh. 🙂 PJH@KAF

  7. Marty

    Oh, too funny! Thanks for being willing to post your failures as well as successes. Your commentary had me literally snorting with laughter- I look forward to seeing these every year. So good to know that even the very best bakers have a flop now and then…

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Glad we could brighten your day, Marty. I have to laugh myself oftentimes when I pull a disaster out of the oven, because some things look SO bad… And then I grab the camera to document them for this post. We already have next year’s folder of pictures started! PJH@KAF

  8. Laura Gafford

    I came home from baking class one day in my first year of culinary school completely pumped up that I was going to make churros for my kids. All was well until about 60 seconds into frying that I had flying churro dough popping everywhere from the floor to the ceiling. Seven years later and oil stains are still on the ceiling and I’m stilled banned from churros.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Wow, Laura, that sounds dangerous! Funny in retrospect, but probably not so much in the midst of popping hot dough, eh? And you still have the oil stains to remember them by… 🙂 PJH@KAF

  9. Maureen

    Thanks for reminding me that I’m not the only one who forgets an ingredient or two – like forgetting the sugar in the scones – interruptions are not ideal when baking.

    Reply
  10. Sharon

    PJ, I’ve been with you for all eleven years. I sat down with my coffee this morning and told my husband that I was really looking forward to a few laughs with you this morning. Thanks to you and all the other Baker’s and bloggers at KA, I’ve made very few mistakes. I’m gong to do my own experiment today, a sour cream lemon pie, with the sour cream, nutmeg, and vanilla pudding layered under the traditional lemon pie filling. Wish me luck!

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Sharon, thanks for your kind words. That pie sounds interesting – how did it turn out? PJH@KAF

  11. Irene Peery

    I wanted to impress some friends with a recipe I had been making my whole life. It was my father’s favorite cake – Brown Velvet Cake with Richmond Frosting. Simple enough cake – beat eggs, buttermilk and sugar, add dry ingredients and melted chocolate and butter. Pour into 9 x 13 pan and bake. The frosting is sugar, water, chocolate, cornstarch and butter. Boiled together and poured over cake. All went as I expected and I set off to my friend’s house. When it came time to serve dessert, she brought out the cake, cut and on plates. I was met with a cake with a white layer and a brown layer. For some reason, the cake batter had separated and formed two distinct layers. It tasted okay but it surely was not what I had intended! I have made it since and it was just as I intended it to look. I still don’t know what happened!

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      How funny, Irene – no idea what could have happened, but it must have been a real head-scratcher! PJH@KAF

  12. Miko

    Technically this isn’t a baking story, but it’s definitely my biggest kitchen disaster. I was making a big batch of chocolate truffles and placed them on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper so I could put them in the refrigerator to harden. I opened the refrigerator door and started to put the pan inside but the door bounced off an open closet door (I had a tiny apartment) and hit the tray I was holding. The parchment slid off and truffles splattered all over the floor and inside the refrigerator. I spent the next hour scraping now hardened chocolate off the floor and the refrigerator shelves. I haven’t made truffles since…

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Miko, I can just picture this happening… the perfect storm of coincidence! PJH@KAF

  13. Bonnie

    I look forward to this annual post. It’s reassuring that even the experts make mistakes and it makes me laugh too. Thanks!

    Reply
  14. Ann

    I was making a rhubarb pie and mixing up the filling when our Thanksgiving company arrived. After hugs and kisses all around I went back to my pie. Rolled out the crust, dumped in the filling and popped it into the oven. The first cut revealed I had neglected to add the sugar The whole thing went into the trash.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Oh, man, that must have been quite a first mouthful, Ann, if you even tasted it – I can only imagine the face you made! Of all the pies to leave out the sugar, rhubarb would be the one least likely to be salvaged. Bet you never made that mistake again! PJH@KAF

    2. Margy

      I remember reading in one of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s “Little House” books about her making “pieplant” (i.e., rhubarb) pies, and forgetting the sugar. I guess baking mistakes are timeless!

  15. Ann Breitenbach

    Thanks for sharing that we are all human. My mistakes were a gift to the dog who loved me dearly.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Ann, I seldom give my dogs my mistakes, as they tend to over-eat. However, I had a loaf of banana bread cooling on the counter recently — NOT a mistake — and it disappeared. Suddenly and completely. I saw my rambunctious 18-month-old “puppy” looking guilty in the corner and, though I can’t prove it, I suspect he enjoyed that banana bread… 🙂 PJH@KAF

  16. Melanie Brown

    These April Fools photos always crack me up – and make me feel better. This year, I had a petit four disaster (not a KAF recipe.) They tasted good, though.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Melanie, that’s often the case: looks awful, tastes just fine. “Waste not, want not,” right? I’ve turned many a crumbled cake into trifle. PJH@KAF

  17. Eileen

    I decided to make chocolate cookies one night when I was tired and should have known better. They were perfect, of course, until I took them out of the oven and they slid off of the parchment paper and into the oven…all over the bottom of the oven!
    I scooped out as much as possible and used the pieces as a topping. All was not loss.

    Reply
  18. Sally Field

    My mother’s birthday was August 12. Every year my father would take her out to dinner, and my sisters and I would bake her a “surprise” birthday cake. You would think eventually the element of surprise would be lost, but we managed to mess up her cakes in a new and different way three years running. The first year, being a very young and inexperienced baker, I put the more level cake layer, the one with the slight crack in the middle, on top of the more domed layer, figuring the icing would make up the difference. Nope, the top layer broke in two and slid down the dome. The next year one sister turned off the preheated oven while the cake was in it. This did not turn out well. The next year, for reasons still unexplained, both layers of the cake just flat disintegrated while being removed from the pans.

    The year after that (and all subsequent years) we made her cake the day before her birthday. Turned out perfect every time.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      See, take away the pressure of a quick turnaround/deadline, and you’re golden! Thanks for sharing, Sally — PJH@KAF

  19. Lois E Kujawa

    You made my day!!! To know that even the experts have flops is very comforting. I recently substituted full fat yogurt for sour cream (was told it was a 1:1 substitution) in a favorite pound cake in Bundt pan.
    Since we live at 5300+ feet, I added the baking powder and soda in reduced amounts/ Colorado Uni. recommendations. It baked wonderfully around the edges for first 40 minutes and then started billowing out the “chimney” and totally collapsed in the middle. This of course set off the smoke alarms. Fire! Fire! is not nice to hear at midnight.
    So my question is was the yogurt the problem ? the baking powder? or the cream of tartar in the egg whites?

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Not a pretty picture, Lois! It’s had to diagnose from afar, but I’d say the yogurt/sour cream substitution was valid; that shouldn’t have been an issue. Nor should the cream of tartar. It sounds like too much baking powder/soda, one way or another. All I can offer is — better luck next time! PJH@KAF

  20. Susan

    Being frugal, I strained oil after using it to fry shrimp.
    Forgot what I’d used said oil for.
    Made pancakes.
    Can you guess?
    Discarded said shrimp-flavored pancakes.
    Lesson: label used oil with previous use!

    Reply
  21. Pamela Peyton

    Lol, really enjoyed this blog. I am a home baker who learned at the bakery from my professional baker-dad. He had some mishaps at home…I learned you just can’t take a recipe for 12 cake rounds and just divide to reduce. On the other hand, ugly mishaps often still taste wonderful…my dad would waste nothing. Ugly bread made croutons or bread pudding, fallen cake or hard cookies made crumbs for crust or for decorating, That fallen cheesecake mess would make a beautiful parfait.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Pamela, you’re so right; very little of what we make actually goes into the compost bin. We repurpose most things… even if the repurposing is just right onto a plate and into the mouth! 🙂 PJH@KAF

  22. Grace Kratovil

    My sister and I once had a contest as to the best angel food cake. I beat mine by hand, she used a mixer. Her beautiful cake feel while still in the oven so the finished cake was only 2″ tall. Mine was beautiful until I turned it upside down on our catsup bottle, when it fell, in pieces, out of the pan. Oh well.

    Reply
  23. Ginny Blair

    Boy did I learn something today! Although I have baked all nature of bread for four decades, I am a brand-new sourdough baker, and I was wondering what I should do with the discards. As every parent of a little person knows, flour plus water = paste! Seemed like a VERY bad idea to put the discard down the drain. Now I have the solution! And my 7 year old granddaughter would be delighted to paint something on the dried out dough!

    Reply
  24. Christopher Smith

    Time after time your recipes turn out such wonderful results, I forget about the work you put in to make us look good. Thanks for the annual, laugh filled, reminder.

    Reply
  25. Christine Nelson

    I generally make bread in four loaf batches, and always several batches, usually different varieties…I love making oatmeal/molasses bread, but you have to boil water, add the oats, molasses, sugar, salt, and let it cool, which usually takes a while. In the meantime, while that mixture is cooling, I make a batch of another variety. By the time I have the second batch in the oven to rise (always raise my bread in the oven with just the oven light on) the oatmeal/molasses mixture is ready to go. Thinking (or not) that for some odd reason the first batch should be ready to be baked (remember, still in the oven for the first rise,) I turned my oven onto preheat. Suddenly the odor of melting plastic from the rising bowl, and the unmistakable smell of bread baking permeated the kitchen. OH NO…I opened the oven door, and melted plastic, and dough was oozing through the rack onto the oven floor. @@##%$##@@@#. Needless to say, it took me almost 2 hours to clean up the mess. I had lost my favorite bread rising bowl, plus 4 loaves worth of dough.You can bet I remember that kerfuffle every time I bake now. SIGH

    Reply
  26. Gail

    I made brownies and popped them in the oven. 4 1/2 hours later my husband asked “what’s that smell?” I ran to the oven and then replied ” Boat anchor! “

    Reply
  27. Monica Soule

    So, it was Dec. 17 a few years ago, and I am finally finishing the last of my Christmas cookies. The oven is all preheated, and the first two pans of Classic Peanut Butter Cookies go in, and I wait……and wait……and wait. “What is taking these cookies so long to bake?” I ask myself. It turns out that you cannot bake cookies with a dead oven! Who knew? So, I get on the phone, call a friend whose oven is still warm from her own Christmas cookies, and load up the cargo area of my car with three parchment lined pans of cookie dough balls and take off for my friend’s house. And as I’m rolling along, I hear the sound of parchment sliding all over the back of the car. Somehow, I managed to salvage almost all of the cookies, but yikes! it’s a week before Christmas, and I have no oven! So off I went, baked cookies and all, to purchase a new stove. Disaster averted! Christmas saved! You’d think the story would end here, no? Au contraire! Because the same thing happened the week before Christmas last year, only this time my husband and I were able to get the part and fix the oven. Unfortunately, having taken the oven door off, we could not get it back on again, so our own personal “gorilla” (our son), had to come over and wrestle the oven door back on. Another Christmas saved! If it ever happens again I’m hanging a sign outside my kitchen that says “Out of business.”

    Reply
  28. Susan

    I was practicing with homemade rolled biscuits and one of my first batches were awful! So bad in every way it was amazing! Being the kind and sweet person that he is my husband tried eating them and told me they weren’t so bad, I had to go over and take them from his hand and throw them away.
    I then discovered your Bakewell cream and I’ve made great biscuits ever since.
    Susan

    Reply
  29. Janice Cagan-Teuber

    For one of my son’s birthday cakes (a long time ago, since he’s now 28) he wanted a theme of Pirates. We went to a cake decorating store, nearby, and bought anything having to do with Pirates. The cake I made was half-sheet, doubled so it would be deep. When it came out of the oven,There was a big hold in the middle (where it was thickest) of gloppy batter. It was too late to bake another, so I changed the original design that he and I had made, and used the “empty” middle as a lagoon, with a Pirate Ship in it, and decorated waterfalls, trees on cliffs, treasure chest, etc. It turned out to be a perfectly themed cake!

    Reply
  30. gap

    The one you can’t identify looks like every single German’s Sweet Chocolate cake that I made when I lived at 7200 ft. I was always hopeful that I’d figured out appropriate altitude mods, and I absolutely never did.
    Looking forward to trying it again now that I’ve moved to the lowlands.

    Reply
  31. Terri

    Just yesterday I had a major Easter dessert fail with a chocolate cheesecake filled bundt cake. Everything looked fine until I sliced and served it and took one bite….bitter and dry as cardboard. Turns out I used the amount of sugar for the cheesecake filling (1/4 cup) in the cake batter instead of the 1 3/4 cup it called for. That’s what happens when you’re distracted and read too quickly!

    Reply
  32. Chris U

    I decided to make your “easy hot cross buns” for Easter. Everything was going fine, and the dough was ready to go for it’s first rise. Then I realized I forgot to put in the orange zest. I got the orange, zested it, sprinkled the zest over the dough, and did my best to work it in. As I was doing that, I realized I had forgotten the sugar. I grabbed the container of brown sugar, realized it was hard as a rock, put it in the microwave to soften, scattered it over the dough, and tried to work it in as best I could. In the end, I think they still came out pretty good, but I will try to pay more attention next time.

    Reply
  33. Peg.D.

    My friends don’t let me forget the time I made my specialty, Irish soda bread, forgetting the soda. We just called it “Irish…bread,” though it was more of an Irish door-stop. (With enough butter and jam and it was still enjoyable though.)

    Reply
  34. Elaine

    I must say that I would refuse to acknowledge many of those as mistakes. It’s one thing if it is important that the item look impressive – a wedding cake, a formal dinner, guests you hope to impress. But for family or close friends, as long as it tastes good, you couldn’t get me to call it a failure for anything! Try it! It makes your life much less complicated.

    Reply
  35. Susan

    That bread with the cheese filling oozing out would be great for Halloween – just add some “eyes” of some kind and you’ll have a monster!

    Reply
  36. Käri

    When making Irish Soda bread the first time, a friend was helping me. When I asked for the 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) of melted butter, his brain translated it to 4 oz. (1 stick) of melted butter. While this was an OOPS! It turnded out to be a wonderful 1. I have subsequently made it with the proper amount of butter but much much prefer Irish Soda bread with 4 oz. of butter. Think banana “bread” texture.😁

    Reply
  37. lucyg22

    When you bake a bundt cake, be sure the oven is set on BAKE–not BROIL. On my oven, this is an easy mistake to make. I was making the dessert for a “catered” dinner that someone had won in a raffle by the parents’ club at my sons’ school, so it had to look good. Everything went great until I started to smell something burning: it was the top of the cake. No time to start over! That dessert had to come from the bakery. Years later, I felt somewhat better when I read in one of James Beard’s cookbooks that he had done the same thing.

    Reply
  38. Sherry Crane

    I could identify every example you showed and I created more of my own over the 52 years that I was married. My husband has passed , so now I’m more likely to see them at my daughter’s house, where she has an enthusiastic 16-year-old daughter who wants to try baking and crepe recipes, as well as Christmas goodies to share. We all are proud when our efforts turn out well and we laugh when they don’t. I was asked to provide a chocolate groom’s cake many years ago for our niece’s wedding. I wasn’t able to do it the day before, so the second layer was still too warm when I turned it out on top of the filling and the first layer. It started cracking and no amount of chocolate frosting could hold it together. We lived in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico, so I just told people at the wedding that it was my Famous Canyon Cake and it was eaten all up!

    Reply
  39. Teresa Brockett

    Just enjoyed reading all the fun comments from other baking bloopers. Although I’m a pastry chef now, (and still make my share of mistakes), my favorite one was made as a young girl, trying to impress a boy. I made him what looked to be a beautiful home made apple pie, except that I forgot the sugar! My dad teased me for years that I did it on purpose to get him to pucker up, lol! 😉

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel, post author

      Teresa, sounds like your dad had a good sense of humor, though at the time you probably didn’t see as much humor in the situation as he did! Think of it this way: at least it wasn’t rhubarb… 🙂 PJH@KAF

  40. Wendy

    This was really fun, thanks! All bakers understand that it can be a fine line between perfection and disaster! It’s actually comforting to know that the experts learn from their mistakes, too. There’s always a next time, and a new batch!

    Reply
  41. Nancy Vogel

    Talking about baking disasters, I was making a Whole wheat bread and I wanted to give the yeast an early start before adding the salt ( which can retard growth). I added the sugar , yeast, some wheat flour, butter and water, mixed, covered and let stand for 30 minutes. When bubbly, I added the rest of the flour and let the dough rise. It rose beautifully, nice and light. I degassed it, shaped it and put it in a loaf pan. I let it rose until crowning the pan slightly,( and again, it rose beautifully). Baked the bread (smelled heavenly) When it was cool enough, I cut it( beautiful texture- NO TASTE. Oops!

    Reply

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